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HISTORY

According to records in the Warner Bros. Archive at USC, the title of Robert E. Sherwood and Bertram Bloch's original story, and an early working title of the film, was Good Night Nurse. According to an item in the Dec 1925 Photoplay, the working title was Nighty-Night Nurse.
       Contemporary sources variously list the tile of the film as Oh! What a Nurse and Oh What a Nurse. It was titled Oh! What a Nurse! when screened at the 2024 San Francisco Silent Film Festival on 11 April 2024. ...

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According to records in the Warner Bros. Archive at USC, the title of Robert E. Sherwood and Bertram Bloch's original story, and an early working title of the film, was Good Night Nurse. According to an item in the Dec 1925 Photoplay, the working title was Nighty-Night Nurse.
       Contemporary sources variously list the tile of the film as Oh! What a Nurse and Oh What a Nurse. It was titled Oh! What a Nurse! when screened at the 2024 San Francisco Silent Film Festival on 11 April 2024.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
7 Mar 1926
---
National Board of Review Magazine
Mar-Apr 1926
p. 23
New York Times
22 Feb 1926
p. 14
Photoplay
Dec 1925
p. 104
Variety
24 Feb 1926
p. 43
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Good Night Nurse
Nighty-Night Nurse
Oh! What a Nurse!
Release Date:
20 March 1926
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 Feb 1926
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
20 February 1926
LP22416
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,930
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Cub reporter Jerry Clark substitutes for Dolly Wimple, the editor of a newspaper advice-to-the-lovelorn column, and advises wealthy June Harrison not to marry Clive Hunt, a man whom she does not love. This advice maddens June's penniless uncle, political boss Tim Harrison, who is in league with Hunt to get his hands on June's fortune. After a series of mad adventures involving rumrunners and female impersonators, Jerry saves June from a forced marriage with Hunt and marries her ...

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Cub reporter Jerry Clark substitutes for Dolly Wimple, the editor of a newspaper advice-to-the-lovelorn column, and advises wealthy June Harrison not to marry Clive Hunt, a man whom she does not love. This advice maddens June's penniless uncle, political boss Tim Harrison, who is in league with Hunt to get his hands on June's fortune. After a series of mad adventures involving rumrunners and female impersonators, Jerry saves June from a forced marriage with Hunt and marries her himself.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.