Old Loves and New (1926)

Romance | 11 April 1926

Full page view
HISTORY

This film was based on Edith Maude Hull’s serialized novel, The Desert Healer, a sequel to the author’s 1919 best-selling novel, The Shiek. Screen rights to The Desert Healer were acquired by Sam E. Rork through literary broker Viola Foster for $20,000, according to the 14 October 1925 Variety and 14 November 1925 Motion Picture News. The film marked Marion Fairfax’s producing debut, although she had recently supervised production on Clothes Make the Pirate (1925, see entry), also a collaboration with Rork, with whom Fairfax had joined forces after her departure from the scenario department at First National Pictures Inc. An article in the 7 November 1925 Motion Picture News explained that Rork and Fairfax’s producing partnership entailed the use of a single technical crew on alternating productions headed by either Rork or Fairfax, to reduce costs. Fairfax was one of very few female producers active at that time, in addition to Lois Weber, Gene Stratton-Porter, and Lillian Ducey, as noted in the 4 May 1926 Film Daily.
       Nita Naldi was initially attached to play the role of “Lady Elinor Carew,” but was replaced by Katherine MacDonald, as announced in the 10 September 1925 Film Daily and 6 January 1926 Variety. The former also stated that Imperial Pictures had originally planned to produce the film adaptation prior to Fairfax’s involvement. Maurice Tourneur was brought on to direct, following his stint as director on Clothes Make the Pirate. An item in the 1 October 1925 [Fort Worth, TX] Fort Worth Record-Telegram claimed that Blanche Sweet and ...

More Less

This film was based on Edith Maude Hull’s serialized novel, The Desert Healer, a sequel to the author’s 1919 best-selling novel, The Shiek. Screen rights to The Desert Healer were acquired by Sam E. Rork through literary broker Viola Foster for $20,000, according to the 14 October 1925 Variety and 14 November 1925 Motion Picture News. The film marked Marion Fairfax’s producing debut, although she had recently supervised production on Clothes Make the Pirate (1925, see entry), also a collaboration with Rork, with whom Fairfax had joined forces after her departure from the scenario department at First National Pictures Inc. An article in the 7 November 1925 Motion Picture News explained that Rork and Fairfax’s producing partnership entailed the use of a single technical crew on alternating productions headed by either Rork or Fairfax, to reduce costs. Fairfax was one of very few female producers active at that time, in addition to Lois Weber, Gene Stratton-Porter, and Lillian Ducey, as noted in the 4 May 1926 Film Daily.
       Nita Naldi was initially attached to play the role of “Lady Elinor Carew,” but was replaced by Katherine MacDonald, as announced in the 10 September 1925 Film Daily and 6 January 1926 Variety. The former also stated that Imperial Pictures had originally planned to produce the film adaptation prior to Fairfax’s involvement. Maurice Tourneur was brought on to direct, following his stint as director on Clothes Make the Pirate. An item in the 1 October 1925 [Fort Worth, TX] Fort Worth Record-Telegram claimed that Blanche Sweet and Mary Astor were considered to play the leading role of “Marny.”
       Principal photography began in early January 1926 at United Studios in Hollywood, CA, and ended in early March 1926, as reported in the 7 March 1926 Los Angeles Times. The film was known by its working title, The Desert Healer, until early April 1926; just prior to theatrical release on 11 April 1926, the 10 April 1926 Moving Picture World announced a “last minute change of title” to Old Loves and New. To capitalize on the book’s popularity, some theaters, including Los Angeles’s Loew’s State Theatre, still advertised the picture as The Desert Healer, as noted in the 23 June 1926 Variety.
       This film marked the acting debut of Ann Rork, daughter of Sam E. Rork.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included Old Loves and New on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
9 Jan 1926
p. 38
Exhibitors Herald
16 Jan 1926
p. 73
Exhibitors Herald
6 Feb 1926
p. 40
Exhibitors Herald
27 Feb 1926
p. 36
Film Daily
10 Sep 1925
p. 1
Film Daily
9 Oct 1925
p. 2
Film Daily
22 Oct 1925
p. 1
Film Daily
5 Nov 1925
p. 6
Film Daily
3 Dec 1925
p. 1
Film Daily
10 Jan 1926
p. 10
Film Daily
10 Mar 1926
p. 1
Film Daily
2 May 1926
---
Film Daily
4 May 1926
---
Film Fun
Jun 1926
p. 61
Fort Worth Record-Telegram [Fort Worth, TX]
1 Oct 1925
p. 13
Knoxville Journal [Knoxville, TN]
24 Jan 1926
p. 3
Lincoln Star [Lincoln, NE]
8 Nov 1925
p. 30
Los Angeles Times
31 Oct 1925
p. 31
Los Angeles Times
10 Jan 1926
Section C, p. 36
Los Angeles Times
20 Jan 1926
Section A, p. 9
Los Angeles Times
7 Mar 1926
p. 40
Los Angeles Times
13 Jun 1926
Section C, pp. 25-26
Los Angeles Times
14 Jun 1926
Section A, p. 11
Motion Picture Magazine
May 1926
---
Motion Picture News
7 Nov 1925
p. 2147
Motion Picture News
14 Nov 1925
p. 2254
Motion Picture News
13 Mar 1926
p. 1193
Moving Picture World
26 Dec 1925
p. 798
Moving Picture World
10 Apr 1926
p. 417
New York Daily News
30 Oct 1925
p. 41
New York Times
11 Apr 1926
---
New York Times
20 Apr 1926
p. 24
Photoplay
Mar 1926
---
Photoplay
Apr 1926
p. 96
Variety
23 Sep 1925
p. 88
Variety
14 Oct 1925
p. 35
Variety
6 Jan 1926
p. 27
Variety
10 Mar 1926
p. 35
Variety
21 Apr 1926
p. 34
Variety
23 Jun 1926
p. 6
Variety
11 Aug 1926
p. 5
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the serialized novel The Desert Healer by Edith Maude Hull (a.k.a. E. M. Hull) in Cosmopolitan (Oct 1922--May 1923).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Desert Healer
Release Date:
11 April 1926
Production Date:
early Jan--early Mar 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
20 April 1926
LP22616
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6, 500 , 7,423
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Gervas Lord Carew returns from the war to find that his wife, Elinor, has deserted him for Lord Geradine, leaving their infant son dying. Embittered and disillusioned, he goes to Algeria and devotes himself to healing the desert tribesmen, who revere him. Meanwhile, Lord Geradine casts aside the faithless Elinor and marries Marny O'Meara. Later, he travels to Algeria for his health. Marny, captured by desert brigands, is rescued by Carew, known as El Hakim, and is attracted to him. Elinor traces Geradine and scores him for his cruelty. She meets her husband again but refuses to return to him when he pretends to be a poor man. Carew rescues Marny from a beating by her husband, carrying her into the desert. Geradine determines to avenge himself but is killed by his hunting elephant, which he has cruelly mistreated; thus Lord Carew and Marny find themselves joined in a new ...

More Less

Gervas Lord Carew returns from the war to find that his wife, Elinor, has deserted him for Lord Geradine, leaving their infant son dying. Embittered and disillusioned, he goes to Algeria and devotes himself to healing the desert tribesmen, who revere him. Meanwhile, Lord Geradine casts aside the faithless Elinor and marries Marny O'Meara. Later, he travels to Algeria for his health. Marny, captured by desert brigands, is rescued by Carew, known as El Hakim, and is attracted to him. Elinor traces Geradine and scores him for his cruelty. She meets her husband again but refuses to return to him when he pretends to be a poor man. Carew rescues Marny from a beating by her husband, carrying her into the desert. Geradine determines to avenge himself but is killed by his hunting elephant, which he has cruelly mistreated; thus Lord Carew and Marny find themselves joined in a new love.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Sampson-Schley Controversy

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: "This subject is in three scenes, showing beautiful dissolving effects. Scene 1. Shows Admiral Schley upon the bridge of the Brooklyn ... >>

Appointment by Telephone

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: “Two young men are seated in a broker's officer. A young lady calls one of them on the telephone and makes ... >>

Grandpa's Reading Glass

The Biograph catalog summarized this film as follows: “A very clever and interesting picture. A family group composed of grandpa, mamma and several children are seen about a library ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.