Oliver Twist (1922)

Melodrama | November 1922

Director:

Frank Lloyd

Cinematographers:

Robert Martin, Glen MacWilliams

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Stephen Goosson

Production Company:

Jackie Coogan Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

The 18 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald announced the upcoming film adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic Oliver Twist, to star popular child actor Jackie Coogan. According to the 25 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald, which cited a near $500,000 budget, large-scale sets were being built for the production, which required additional space to be leased at United Studios in Los Angeles, CA. Sol Lesser, who produced the picture for Jackie Coogan Productions, planned to “road-show” the picture upon its release, sending Coogan out to make personal appearances before screenings, at a cost of $2 per admission. The 25 Mar 1922 Moving Picture World announced that principal photography was set to begin that week.
       On 13 May 1922, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that filming had been underway for four weeks, with an additional four weeks anticipated until completion. The news item noted two firsts for Jackie Coogan: the first night shoots of his career, and the first time he performed accompanied by an orchestra. Director Frank Lloyd hired a six-piece orchestra to support the actors while portraying different moods during filming. The 3 Jun 1922 Moving Picture World reported that production had finished that week.
       Sol Lesser purchased the negative film prints to the production of Oliver Twist that was created twelve years earlier by H. A. Spanuth, to prevent reissues from being released and competing with his own production, according to the 3 Jun 1922 Exhibitors Herald.
       Reviews were mostly positive, calling the picture “loyal to the book,” despite the fact that Jackie Coogan was much younger and healthier than popular depictions of ... More Less

The 18 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald announced the upcoming film adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic Oliver Twist, to star popular child actor Jackie Coogan. According to the 25 Mar 1922 Exhibitors Herald, which cited a near $500,000 budget, large-scale sets were being built for the production, which required additional space to be leased at United Studios in Los Angeles, CA. Sol Lesser, who produced the picture for Jackie Coogan Productions, planned to “road-show” the picture upon its release, sending Coogan out to make personal appearances before screenings, at a cost of $2 per admission. The 25 Mar 1922 Moving Picture World announced that principal photography was set to begin that week.
       On 13 May 1922, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that filming had been underway for four weeks, with an additional four weeks anticipated until completion. The news item noted two firsts for Jackie Coogan: the first night shoots of his career, and the first time he performed accompanied by an orchestra. Director Frank Lloyd hired a six-piece orchestra to support the actors while portraying different moods during filming. The 3 Jun 1922 Moving Picture World reported that production had finished that week.
       Sol Lesser purchased the negative film prints to the production of Oliver Twist that was created twelve years earlier by H. A. Spanuth, to prevent reissues from being released and competing with his own production, according to the 3 Jun 1922 Exhibitors Herald.
       Reviews were mostly positive, calling the picture “loyal to the book,” despite the fact that Jackie Coogan was much younger and healthier than popular depictions of the Dickens orphan, as noted in the Dec 1922 Visual Education film review.
       Additional American film adaptations were produced in 1907, 1909, two in 1910, 1912, 1916, and 1933 (see entries). For further information on these releases, see the 1933 entry of Oliver Twist directed by William J. Cowen.
       The Film Year Book 1922-1923 named Oliver Twist one of the year's "Ten Best."
       It is available on YouTube in 2016. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
18 Mar 1922
p. 36.
Exhibitors Herald
25 Mar 1922
p. 48.
Exhibitors Herald
3 Jun 1922
p. 35.
Exhibitors Trade Review
13 May 1922.
---
Film Daily
12 Nov 1922
p. 3.
Film Year Book
1922-1923
p. 349.
Moving Picture World
25 Mar 1922.
---
Moving Picture World
3 Jun 1922.
---
New York Times
30 Oct 1922
p. 11.
Variety
10 Nov 1922
p. 42.
Visual Education
Dec 1922.
---
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1922
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 30 October 1922
Production Date:
late March--early June 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Sol L. Lesser
Copyright Date:
10 November 1922
Copyright Number:
LP18385
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,600
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dramatization of that part of the Dickens novel in which Oliver is orphaned, apprenticed to an undertaker, taught pickpocketing by Fagin, rescued by Mr. Brownlow, kidnaped and plotted against by Monks and the Sikeses, and recovered by Mr. Brownlow--happy and secure in the knowledge that he will receive the inheritance due ... +


Dramatization of that part of the Dickens novel in which Oliver is orphaned, apprenticed to an undertaker, taught pickpocketing by Fagin, rescued by Mr. Brownlow, kidnaped and plotted against by Monks and the Sikeses, and recovered by Mr. Brownlow--happy and secure in the knowledge that he will receive the inheritance due him. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Historical


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.