Omar the Tentmaker (1922)

Melodrama | December 1922

Full page view
HISTORY

The 20 May 1921 Var announced the upcoming film adaptation, based on the 1914 play Omar the Tentmaker by Richard Walter Tully, with locations at Brunton Studios in Hollywood (to be known as United Studios in 1922). Frederick Warde was announced to star, but he did not appear in the picture. One month later, the 24 Jun 1921 FD reported that Associated First National had struck a deal to produce two of Richard Walter Tully’s plays: Omar the Tentmaker and The Masquerader, and pre-production was underway. Actor Guy Bates Post, who starred in both stage plays for a combined decade, had been hired to reprise his role as “Omar” in the film adaptation, and Richard Walter Tully would serve as advisor to director James Young. According to the Oct 1922 Photodramatist, Post played “Omar” onstage for four years before taking on the film role, despite a news item in the 26 Nov 1921 Exhibitors Herald that announced Rudolph Valentino was in consideration for the part.
       The 30 Jul 1921 Moving Picture World announced the arrival of shipments from Persia, the Near East, Asia Minor, and Northern Africa, consisting of a “carload of tapestries, Oriental rugs, costumes and effects” to decorate the exotic film set.
       Principal photography began in early Jun 1922, according to the 10 Jun 1922 Moving Picture World. Previous reports anticipated start dates on 1 Dec 1921 and early Apr 1922, as noted in the 26 Nov 1921 Exhibitors Herald and the 3 Mar 1922 Var. The delays were most likely due to the filming ... More Less

The 20 May 1921 Var announced the upcoming film adaptation, based on the 1914 play Omar the Tentmaker by Richard Walter Tully, with locations at Brunton Studios in Hollywood (to be known as United Studios in 1922). Frederick Warde was announced to star, but he did not appear in the picture. One month later, the 24 Jun 1921 FD reported that Associated First National had struck a deal to produce two of Richard Walter Tully’s plays: Omar the Tentmaker and The Masquerader, and pre-production was underway. Actor Guy Bates Post, who starred in both stage plays for a combined decade, had been hired to reprise his role as “Omar” in the film adaptation, and Richard Walter Tully would serve as advisor to director James Young. According to the Oct 1922 Photodramatist, Post played “Omar” onstage for four years before taking on the film role, despite a news item in the 26 Nov 1921 Exhibitors Herald that announced Rudolph Valentino was in consideration for the part.
       The 30 Jul 1921 Moving Picture World announced the arrival of shipments from Persia, the Near East, Asia Minor, and Northern Africa, consisting of a “carload of tapestries, Oriental rugs, costumes and effects” to decorate the exotic film set.
       Principal photography began in early Jun 1922, according to the 10 Jun 1922 Moving Picture World. Previous reports anticipated start dates on 1 Dec 1921 and early Apr 1922, as noted in the 26 Nov 1921 Exhibitors Herald and the 3 Mar 1922 Var. The delays were most likely due to the filming of The Masquerader, which went into production before Omar the Tentmaker, and was also directed by James Young and starred Guy Bates Post in his theatrical feature film debut.
       The Sep 1922 Photodramatist announced that production had recently completed.
       News items in the 13 Oct 1922 FD and the Nov 1922 Photodramatist note that Sam Mogi was responsible for camera work on the production, and that James Ewens served as assistant director.
       On 28 Nov 1922, the picture screened for critics at Wurlitzer Hall in New York City, followed by presentations from war correspondent, Hamilton M. Wright, and A. N. Mitzaoff, an authority on “Oriental philosophy.” Reviews praised its costumes and set design, but deemed the picture “disappointing,” noting that the lengthy sequences were “tiresome,” according to the 3 Dec 1922 FD. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
26 Nov 1921.
p. 30.
Exhibitors Herald
26 Nov 1921
p. 30.
Film Daily
24 Jun 1921.
---
Film Daily
13 Oct 1922.
---
Film Daily
3 Dec 1922
p. 10.
Motion Picture News
20 Aug 1921
p. 976.
Moving Picture World
30 Jul 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
10 Jun 1922.
---
Photodramatist
Sep 1922
p. 28.
Photodramatist
Oct 1922
pp. 7-8.
Photodramatist
Nov 1922
p. 17-18, 42.
Variety
20 May 1921
p. 42.
Variety
3 Mar 1922
p. 45.
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1922
Production Date:
early June--September 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Associated First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
9 November 1922
Copyright Number:
LP18376
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,090
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The student Omar loves and secretly marries Shireen, but she is taken away by the Shah of Shahs to join his household. For spurning the shah, Shireen is thrown into a dungeon, then sold into slavery when her child is born. Years pass: Omar's boyhood friends, Nizam and Hassan, have become grand vizier and governor, respectively, and Omar has brought up Little Shireen, whom he believes to be the daughter of the shah. When Omar is arrested and tortured for sheltering a Christain crusader, Nizam frees Omar, punishes Hassan for ordering the torture, and reunites Shireen with Omar and their ... +


The student Omar loves and secretly marries Shireen, but she is taken away by the Shah of Shahs to join his household. For spurning the shah, Shireen is thrown into a dungeon, then sold into slavery when her child is born. Years pass: Omar's boyhood friends, Nizam and Hassan, have become grand vizier and governor, respectively, and Omar has brought up Little Shireen, whom he believes to be the daughter of the shah. When Omar is arrested and tortured for sheltering a Christain crusader, Nizam frees Omar, punishes Hassan for ordering the torture, and reunites Shireen with Omar and their daughter. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Historical


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

KEEP EXPLORING
Crusades, Parenthood, Persia, Slavery, Tents
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.