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HISTORY

This film was based on a short story of the same name by Frederick Hazlitt Brennan which appeared in the 22 June 1929 issue of Liberty magazine. Principal photography began on 6 February 1930 at First National Studios in Hollywood, CA, as stated in the 22 February 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World.
       An item in the 7 March 1930 Film Daily noted that Donna Grant, a “chorus girl with a remarkable memory,” was cueing actors on the set of One Night at Susie’s, and Louise Closser Hale was named as a supporting cast member in the 7 June 1930 Motion Picture News.
       Contemporary and modern sources conflict on the running time of this film. The 1 November 1930 Motion Picture News review listed a length of 5,760 feet and a running time of 64 minutes, while the 23 November 1930 Film Daily review cited a run time of 85 minutes. Copyright records claimed the picture was eight reels in length. This film is extant and was released on DVD by Warner Archive Collection. ...

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This film was based on a short story of the same name by Frederick Hazlitt Brennan which appeared in the 22 June 1929 issue of Liberty magazine. Principal photography began on 6 February 1930 at First National Studios in Hollywood, CA, as stated in the 22 February 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World.
       An item in the 7 March 1930 Film Daily noted that Donna Grant, a “chorus girl with a remarkable memory,” was cueing actors on the set of One Night at Susie’s, and Louise Closser Hale was named as a supporting cast member in the 7 June 1930 Motion Picture News.
       Contemporary and modern sources conflict on the running time of this film. The 1 November 1930 Motion Picture News review listed a length of 5,760 feet and a running time of 64 minutes, while the 23 November 1930 Film Daily review cited a run time of 85 minutes. Copyright records claimed the picture was eight reels in length. This film is extant and was released on DVD by Warner Archive Collection.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald-World
22 Feb 1930
pp. 54-55
Film Daily
30 Jan 1930
p. 7
Film Daily
9 Feb 1930
p. 4
Film Daily
16 Feb 1930
p. 7
Film Daily
7 Mar 1930
p. 3
Film Daily
23 Nov 1930
---
Motion Picture News
8 Feb 1930
p. 66
Motion Picture News
1 Mar 1930
p. 26
Motion Picture News
7 Mar 1930
p. 3
Motion Picture News
7 Jun 1930
p. 56
Motion Picture News
1 Nov 1930
p. 51
New York Times
24 Nov 1930
p. 26
Variety
29 Jan 1930
p. 10
Variety
26 Nov 1930
p. 18
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the story "One Night at Susie's" by Frederick Hazlitt Brennan in Liberty magazine (22 Jun 1929).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 October 1930
Production Date:
began 6 Feb 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
14 October 1930
LP1646
Physical Properties:
Sound
Vitaphone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
57 or 64
Length(in feet):
5,760
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Susie, a friend to gangsters and ex-convicts, rears Dick Rollins, son of a dead convict, making certain that he steers clear of underworld elements, and gets him a job as a press agent. When he brings home Mary, a chorus girl, and announces their engagement, Susie is infuriated. Hayes, the producer of Mary's show, gives them an engagement party, but at the last minute Dick has to work; later, he discovers that Mary killed Hayes to escape from his advances and assumes the blame himself. Despite Mary's protests, Dick is convicted of manslaughter. Although Susie regrets the turn of events, she places hope in Mary's future with Dick. While in prison, Dick writes a play for Mary; unable to obtain a producer for it, Mary accepts the offer of Drake to stage the play if she is included in the deal. Houlihan, who has unsuccessfully pursued Mary, learns of her relations with Drake and informs Susie. After denial, Mary confesses the truth to Susie; Susie promises not to tell Dick, and the lovers are reunited upon his ...

More Less

Susie, a friend to gangsters and ex-convicts, rears Dick Rollins, son of a dead convict, making certain that he steers clear of underworld elements, and gets him a job as a press agent. When he brings home Mary, a chorus girl, and announces their engagement, Susie is infuriated. Hayes, the producer of Mary's show, gives them an engagement party, but at the last minute Dick has to work; later, he discovers that Mary killed Hayes to escape from his advances and assumes the blame himself. Despite Mary's protests, Dick is convicted of manslaughter. Although Susie regrets the turn of events, she places hope in Mary's future with Dick. While in prison, Dick writes a play for Mary; unable to obtain a producer for it, Mary accepts the offer of Drake to stage the play if she is included in the deal. Houlihan, who has unsuccessfully pursued Mary, learns of her relations with Drake and informs Susie. After denial, Mary confesses the truth to Susie; Susie promises not to tell Dick, and the lovers are reunited upon his release.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.