One Romantic Night (1930)

73 mins | Romance | 3 May 1930

Director:

Paul L. Stein

Writer:

Melville Baker

Cinematographer:

Karl Struss

Editor:

James Smith

Production Company:

United Artists Corp.
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HISTORY

The DVD viewed, which apparently was taken from a reissue print from the mid-1930s, listed the film's title as The Swan . Joseph M. Schenck and John W. Considine, Jr. were not credited. Instead there was a title card that read "Emil C. Jennings presents." Jennings was an independent producer and distributor who rereleased several United Artists pictures in the 1930s.
       One Romantic Night marked the first talking picture of actress Lillian Gish. Other films based on the Ferenc Molnár play include the 1925 Famous Players-Lasky production The Swan , directed by Dimitri Buchowetzki and starring Frances Howard and Adolphe Menjou and the 1956 M-G-M production of the same title, directed by Charles Vidor and starring Grace Kelly and Alec Guinness (see entries ... More Less

The DVD viewed, which apparently was taken from a reissue print from the mid-1930s, listed the film's title as The Swan . Joseph M. Schenck and John W. Considine, Jr. were not credited. Instead there was a title card that read "Emil C. Jennings presents." Jennings was an independent producer and distributor who rereleased several United Artists pictures in the 1930s.
       One Romantic Night marked the first talking picture of actress Lillian Gish. Other films based on the Ferenc Molnár play include the 1925 Famous Players-Lasky production The Swan , directed by Dimitri Buchowetzki and starring Frances Howard and Adolphe Menjou and the 1956 M-G-M production of the same title, directed by Charles Vidor and starring Grace Kelly and Alec Guinness (see entries below). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
5 Apr 1930
p. 37.
Film Daily
30 Mar 1930
p. 8.
Life
27 Jun 1930
p. 17.
New York Times
31 May 1930
p. 19.
New Yorker
7 Jun 1930
p. 71.
Time
16 Jun 1930
p. 23.
Variety
4 Jun 1930
p. 36.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
[Settings] executed by
MUSIC
Mus arr
SOUND
Sd eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Á Hattyú Vigjatek Három Felvonasbarn (The Swan) by Ferenc Molnár (Budapest, 1914), and the play The Swan , translated and adapted by Melville C. Baker (New York, 23 Oct 1923).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Swan
Release Date:
3 May 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Joseph M. Schenck
Copyright Date:
5 May 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1275
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73
Length(in feet):
6,592
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Because of political exigencies and his father's royal command, the fun-loving Prince Albert is persuaded to court the favor of Alexandra, daughter of the dowager Princess Beatrice. At her country home, Alexandra makes it clear to the prince that a forced marriage would be distasteful to her; and as a result, he tries to win her. Beatrice, piqued by her daughter's coolness, compels her to make a last effort to accept the prince by inviting he family's tutor, astronomer Dr. Haller, to a ball planned in Albert's honor. The now jealous Albert declares his love, but believes Alexandra is in love with Haller after they are seen in an innocently compromising embrace. That same night, Albert receives a telegram, signed by his country's foreign minister, stating that a political crisis compels him to return home and marry Princess Marie of Hohenbergen. Albert visits Alexandra and confesses his love, but tells her that he must wed Princess Marie, whom he has never met, or forfeit his throne. Alexandra realizes now that she loves Albert, whom she has known since childhood, and they jokingly talk about running away to South America. The next day, Haller tells Alexandra he feels she pities rather than loves him and he must leave. After Haller departs, Albert goes to Alexandra. After declaring their love for each other, they decide to elope to South America. Beatrice is hysterical when they leave, until Father Benedict, her down-to-earth brother, reveals that it was he who sent the telegram, there is no political crisis and no Princess Marie. ... +


Because of political exigencies and his father's royal command, the fun-loving Prince Albert is persuaded to court the favor of Alexandra, daughter of the dowager Princess Beatrice. At her country home, Alexandra makes it clear to the prince that a forced marriage would be distasteful to her; and as a result, he tries to win her. Beatrice, piqued by her daughter's coolness, compels her to make a last effort to accept the prince by inviting he family's tutor, astronomer Dr. Haller, to a ball planned in Albert's honor. The now jealous Albert declares his love, but believes Alexandra is in love with Haller after they are seen in an innocently compromising embrace. That same night, Albert receives a telegram, signed by his country's foreign minister, stating that a political crisis compels him to return home and marry Princess Marie of Hohenbergen. Albert visits Alexandra and confesses his love, but tells her that he must wed Princess Marie, whom he has never met, or forfeit his throne. Alexandra realizes now that she loves Albert, whom she has known since childhood, and they jokingly talk about running away to South America. The next day, Haller tells Alexandra he feels she pities rather than loves him and he must leave. After Haller departs, Albert goes to Alexandra. After declaring their love for each other, they decide to elope to South America. Beatrice is hysterical when they leave, until Father Benedict, her down-to-earth brother, reveals that it was he who sent the telegram, there is no political crisis and no Princess Marie. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.