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HISTORY

A "Production Highlights" item in the 6 Dec 1924 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the film was set to be shot at the Biograph Studios at 807 E. 175th Street in New York City. ...

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A "Production Highlights" item in the 6 Dec 1924 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the film was set to be shot at the Biograph Studios at 807 E. 175th Street in New York City.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Free Press (Carbondale, IL)
16 Sep 1925
p. 2
Exhibitors Trade Review
6 Dec 1924
p. 33
Film Daily
29 Mar 1925
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel One Way Street by Beale Davis (New York, c1924).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 April 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
20 March 1925
LP21251
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,600
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Bobby Austin becomes infatuated with Lady Sylvia Hutton, a leading member of British society, and asks that she divorce her husband and marry him instead. Lady Sylvia refuses, and Bobby terminates their relationship. To escape the humiliation of being put aside, the irate noblewoman then makes it appear that Bobby has cheated at cards and orders him from her house. Elizabeth Stuart, a beautiful young woman in love with Bobby, finds proof of Lady Hutton's duplicity and confronts her with it. Lady Sylvia becomes enraged and then suddenly loses her beauty, becoming in seconds a withered old hag. She subsequently reveals that she was once an operatic favorite, had been cast aside when her voice gave out, and had lately been restored to the appearance of youth by a surgeon so that she might return to society and again bask in its acclaim. Bobby tells Elizabeth of his love, while Lady Sylvia finds solace in the arms of her ...

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Bobby Austin becomes infatuated with Lady Sylvia Hutton, a leading member of British society, and asks that she divorce her husband and marry him instead. Lady Sylvia refuses, and Bobby terminates their relationship. To escape the humiliation of being put aside, the irate noblewoman then makes it appear that Bobby has cheated at cards and orders him from her house. Elizabeth Stuart, a beautiful young woman in love with Bobby, finds proof of Lady Hutton's duplicity and confronts her with it. Lady Sylvia becomes enraged and then suddenly loses her beauty, becoming in seconds a withered old hag. She subsequently reveals that she was once an operatic favorite, had been cast aside when her voice gave out, and had lately been restored to the appearance of youth by a surgeon so that she might return to society and again bask in its acclaim. Bobby tells Elizabeth of his love, while Lady Sylvia finds solace in the arms of her husband.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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