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HISTORY

The film was announced in the 27 June 1927 [Los Angeles, CA] Evening Citizen News as a starring vehicle for actor Monte Blue, with Roy Del Ruth as director. The latter was ultimately replaced by Howard Bretherton. Former heavyweight boxing champion James J. Jeffries returned to public life for the production, in which he served as Blue’s trainer and co-star. The 16 July 1927 New York Daily News and 19 July 1927 Los Angeles Times noted that the majority of cast members were pugilists, including Tom Gallery, husband-manager of actress ZaSu Pitts and member of a Los Angeles fight club; Australian athlete Frank Hagney, renowned for rowing as well as for boxing; and retired fighters Abdul “The Turk” Malgan and “Texas Kid” Jackson.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin on 10 July 1927, as stated in the 29 June 1927 Evening Citizen News. The close of production was reported one month later in the 10 August 1927 Los Angeles Times. An article in the 7 August 1927 [Oakland, CA] Tribune revealed that Monte Blue sustained “a badly wrenched elbow” during a fight scene with Jeffries. The 20 August 1927 [Brooklyn, NY] Life and Activities of Long Island Society reported that Blue also suffered a sprained wrist during the final boxing sequence. Sportswriter Benjamin “Rob Roy” Benton was identified as both a technical advisor and a cast member in the 17 September 1927 [Calgary, Alberta, Canada] Herald. The film’s general release was scheduled for that day.
       One-Round Hogan opened during the week ...

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The film was announced in the 27 June 1927 [Los Angeles, CA] Evening Citizen News as a starring vehicle for actor Monte Blue, with Roy Del Ruth as director. The latter was ultimately replaced by Howard Bretherton. Former heavyweight boxing champion James J. Jeffries returned to public life for the production, in which he served as Blue’s trainer and co-star. The 16 July 1927 New York Daily News and 19 July 1927 Los Angeles Times noted that the majority of cast members were pugilists, including Tom Gallery, husband-manager of actress ZaSu Pitts and member of a Los Angeles fight club; Australian athlete Frank Hagney, renowned for rowing as well as for boxing; and retired fighters Abdul “The Turk” Malgan and “Texas Kid” Jackson.
       Principal photography was scheduled to begin on 10 July 1927, as stated in the 29 June 1927 Evening Citizen News. The close of production was reported one month later in the 10 August 1927 Los Angeles Times. An article in the 7 August 1927 [Oakland, CA] Tribune revealed that Monte Blue sustained “a badly wrenched elbow” during a fight scene with Jeffries. The 20 August 1927 [Brooklyn, NY] Life and Activities of Long Island Society reported that Blue also suffered a sprained wrist during the final boxing sequence. Sportswriter Benjamin “Rob Roy” Benton was identified as both a technical advisor and a cast member in the 17 September 1927 [Calgary, Alberta, Canada] Herald. The film’s general release was scheduled for that day.
       One-Round Hogan opened during the week of 25 September 1927 at the State Theatre in Pittsburgh, PA; on 9 October 1927 at the Uptown Theatre in Detroit, MI; and on 13 April 1928 at the Boulevard Theatre in Los Angeles. According to the 16 April 1928 Los Angeles Times, the third night of the Boulevard engagement featured a “boxing contest” between two students of Loyola Marymount University. Director Howard Bretherton, cast members Tom Gallery, Frank Hagney, Robert E. Perry, and scenarist Charles R. Gordon were all expected to attend.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Brooklyn Life and Activities of Long Island [Brooklyn, NY]
20 Aug 1927
p. 19
Calgary Herald [Calgary, Alberta, Canada]
17 Sep 1927
p. 19
Detroit Free Press [Detroit, MI]
28 Aug 1927
p. 48
Detroit Free Press [Detroit, MI]
6 Oct 1927
p. 20
Film Daily
16 Oct 1927
p. 7
Fresno Bee [Fresno, CA]
29 Jun 1927
p. 10
Los Angeles Evening Citizen News [Los Angeles, CA]
27 Jun 1927
p. 4
Los Angeles Evening Citizen News [Los Angeles, CA]
29 Jun 1927
p. 5
Los Angeles Times
29 Jun 1927
p. 26
Los Angeles Times
19 Jul 1927
Section A, p. 10
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1927
Section A, p. 8
Los Angeles Times
12 Apr 1928
Section A, p. 11
Los Angeles Times
16 Apr 1928
Section A, p. 7
Motion Picture News
29 Jul 1927
p. 302
New York Daily News
16 Jul 1927
p. 66
Oakland Tribune [Oakland, CA]
7 Aug 1927
p. 94
Pittsburgh Press [Pittsburgh, PA]
25 Sep 1927
p. 84
Variety
26 Oct 1927
p. 19
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 September 1927
Premiere Information:
Pittsburgh, PA, opening: week of 25 Sep 1927; Detroit opening: 9 Oct 1927; New York opening: week of 24 Oct 1927; Los Angeles opening: 13 Apr 1928
Production Date:
10 Jul--early Aug 1927
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
10 September 1927
LP24386
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,357
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Robert Emmet Hogan, son of famous boxer Tim Hogan, battles his way to the light heavyweight championship of the world. His closest friend, Ed Davis, worships Robert and aspires to a boxing career of his own. He introduces the fighter to Helen, his sister who despises the ring and its followers. Robert, at the insistence of his ambitious manager, "Big Joe" Morgan, is to fight a leading contender, but at the last minute, Ed is persuaded to substitute. Robert agrees to the fight if Ed abandons his plans for a career. After Robert scores a knockout, Big Joe strikes Ed in a fury and kills him. Robert is found innocent of manslaughter but decides to quit boxing, believing that he is a killer. When Big Joe taunts Robert with accusations of cowardice, the latter challenges him to a fight. While Robert takes a beating in the ring, the Texas Kid divulges the secret of Ed’s murder to Helen. She informs Robert, who regains his confidence and wins the fight, along with Helen's ...

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Robert Emmet Hogan, son of famous boxer Tim Hogan, battles his way to the light heavyweight championship of the world. His closest friend, Ed Davis, worships Robert and aspires to a boxing career of his own. He introduces the fighter to Helen, his sister who despises the ring and its followers. Robert, at the insistence of his ambitious manager, "Big Joe" Morgan, is to fight a leading contender, but at the last minute, Ed is persuaded to substitute. Robert agrees to the fight if Ed abandons his plans for a career. After Robert scores a knockout, Big Joe strikes Ed in a fury and kills him. Robert is found innocent of manslaughter but decides to quit boxing, believing that he is a killer. When Big Joe taunts Robert with accusations of cowardice, the latter challenges him to a fight. While Robert takes a beating in the ring, the Texas Kid divulges the secret of Ed’s murder to Helen. She informs Robert, who regains his confidence and wins the fight, along with Helen's love.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.