Law and Lead (1936)

57 or 60 mins | Western | 1936

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HISTORY

Although there is a copyright statement on the opening title card of the film, the title is not listed in the copyright catalog. Soledad Jiménez' name was misspelled onscreen as "Solidad Jiminez," and her character is incorrectly listed as "Señor Gonzales" in the Var review. Sound engineer Hans Weeren's name is spelled Wearen in the onscreen credits. Although the Var lists Republic Pictures Corp. as the film's distributor, Republic most likely served only as the local New York exchange and not as the nationwide distributor. Modern sources note the film's release date as 15 Nov 1936 and include the following actors in the cast: Lloyd Ingraham, Karl Hackett, Ed Cassidy and Lew ... More Less

Although there is a copyright statement on the opening title card of the film, the title is not listed in the copyright catalog. Soledad Jiménez' name was misspelled onscreen as "Solidad Jiminez," and her character is incorrectly listed as "Señor Gonzales" in the Var review. Sound engineer Hans Weeren's name is spelled Wearen in the onscreen credits. Although the Var lists Republic Pictures Corp. as the film's distributor, Republic most likely served only as the local New York exchange and not as the nationwide distributor. Modern sources note the film's release date as 15 Nov 1936 and include the following actors in the cast: Lloyd Ingraham, Karl Hackett, Ed Cassidy and Lew Meehan. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture Daily
22 Oct 37
p. 8.
Variety
21 Apr 37
p. 15.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1936
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 April 1937
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
57 or 60
Length(in feet):
5,474
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
2912
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Cattlemen's Association agent Jimmy Sawyer successfully wraps up another case and is about to take a well-deserved vacation when he finds out that another agent, Ned Hyland, is investigating a bandit called the Juarez Kid. Jimmy is stunned, because he himself captured and reformed the Juarez Kid, who is now known as Pancho Gonzales, three years before. Jimmy takes over the case and goes to visit Pancho. Pancho, meanwhile, is himself greatly upset by the bandit, who has falsely assumed his former name, and swears to his mother that he will discover the scoundrel's identity. Jimmy arrives at the ranch of Hawley and his daughter Hope, who treats Jimmy with suspicion. She warms up once he tells her that he is not a law agent, and she tells him that her father was wounded in the Juarez Kid's latest stagecoach robbery. Pancho, on the trail of the false Juarez Kid, is shot by him and is eventually found by Jimmy, who was following Pancho's dog, "Friday." Friday carries a mysterious note that appears to be meant for the bandit, and after Jimmy helps Pancho, he follows Friday again to find the note's recipient. Back on the Hawley ranch, Hope discusses Jimmy with hired hand Steve Bradley, who proposes to her and intimates that her father is the outlaw. Friday comes to Steve and Hope, and while Steve follows the dog, Hope goes home even more suspicious of her father, as Friday was headed toward their ranch. Steve goes to the saloon owned by Pancho and his mother, Señora Gonzales, and talks with the señora. Steve tells her that all is ... +


Cattlemen's Association agent Jimmy Sawyer successfully wraps up another case and is about to take a well-deserved vacation when he finds out that another agent, Ned Hyland, is investigating a bandit called the Juarez Kid. Jimmy is stunned, because he himself captured and reformed the Juarez Kid, who is now known as Pancho Gonzales, three years before. Jimmy takes over the case and goes to visit Pancho. Pancho, meanwhile, is himself greatly upset by the bandit, who has falsely assumed his former name, and swears to his mother that he will discover the scoundrel's identity. Jimmy arrives at the ranch of Hawley and his daughter Hope, who treats Jimmy with suspicion. She warms up once he tells her that he is not a law agent, and she tells him that her father was wounded in the Juarez Kid's latest stagecoach robbery. Pancho, on the trail of the false Juarez Kid, is shot by him and is eventually found by Jimmy, who was following Pancho's dog, "Friday." Friday carries a mysterious note that appears to be meant for the bandit, and after Jimmy helps Pancho, he follows Friday again to find the note's recipient. Back on the Hawley ranch, Hope discusses Jimmy with hired hand Steve Bradley, who proposes to her and intimates that her father is the outlaw. Friday comes to Steve and Hope, and while Steve follows the dog, Hope goes home even more suspicious of her father, as Friday was headed toward their ranch. Steve goes to the saloon owned by Pancho and his mother, Señora Gonzales, and talks with the señora. Steve tells her that all is going according to plan, with Hope suspecting her father of the crimes. The señora protests that even though Steve is her nephew and she must therefore help him, she is worried about Pancho. Steve tells her she must obey him and leaves. The señora then finds the injured Pancho and tends to him until Jimmy arrives. Jimmy questions Pancho about Steve and the Hawleys, while at their ranch, the Hawleys read a newspaper article identifying Jimmy. Jimmy goes to the ranch, and after Hope bitterly accuses him of being a spy, she tells him that her father has disappeared. After Hope leaves to search for Hawley, Jimmy sees Steve prowling in the house, and after a fight, Steve escapes dressed in his bandit costume. At Pancho's saloon, Hawley finally convinces Hope of his innocence, while in the back, the señora meets Steve. Jimmy sneaks up on them and captures Steve, and after Steve agrees not to implicate the señora, Jimmy tells him that he will try to help him. Hope apologizes to Jimmy, and he tells her he will be back during his vacation. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.