Pals of the Prairie (1929)

57 mins | Western | July 1929

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HISTORY

The 8 Dec 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced that the production starting date for Pals of the Prairie was 26 Nov 1928. ...

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The 8 Dec 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced that the production starting date for Pals of the Prairie was 26 Nov 1928.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1928
p. 50
Film Daily
28 Jul 1929
---
Variety
31 Jul 1929
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Story
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Virgil Miller
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
DETAILS
Release Date:
July 1929
Premiere Information:
release: 7 Jul or 9 Jul 1929
Production Date:
began 26 Nov 1928
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
F.B.O. Productions, Inc.
7 July 1929
LP574
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Mus score and sd eff by RCA Photophone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si.
Duration(in mins):
57
Length(in feet):
4,776
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Red Hepner and his comrade, Hank Robbins, ride into the little Mexican village of Cajón to find the townsfolk under a reign of terror imposed by the mysterious badman, El Lobo, and the mayor critical of a budding romance between his son Francisco and fiery Dolores. The mayor favors a match between Dolores and Peter Sangor, a resident American in Cajón, who provokes Red's immediate disdain and soon has him locked up after Red bombards him with tomatoes. Sangor kidnaps Francisco despite Red and Hank's efforts; the two pals try to free him but are captured by the bandits and soon escape with the news that Sangor is El Lobo. Red goes to town for help while Hank remains to cut Francisco loose from his bonds just as he is about to be forced to watch Sangor ravage his heart's desire. Their showdown is suddenly joined by the rest of El Lobo's band, followed closely by Don José and the rurales, summoned by Red. The bandits are done in, and the mayor has the two heroes name their reward; they ask him to permit the marriage of Francisco and ...

More Less

Red Hepner and his comrade, Hank Robbins, ride into the little Mexican village of Cajón to find the townsfolk under a reign of terror imposed by the mysterious badman, El Lobo, and the mayor critical of a budding romance between his son Francisco and fiery Dolores. The mayor favors a match between Dolores and Peter Sangor, a resident American in Cajón, who provokes Red's immediate disdain and soon has him locked up after Red bombards him with tomatoes. Sangor kidnaps Francisco despite Red and Hank's efforts; the two pals try to free him but are captured by the bandits and soon escape with the news that Sangor is El Lobo. Red goes to town for help while Hank remains to cut Francisco loose from his bonds just as he is about to be forced to watch Sangor ravage his heart's desire. Their showdown is suddenly joined by the rest of El Lobo's band, followed closely by Don José and the rurales, summoned by Red. The bandits are done in, and the mayor has the two heroes name their reward; they ask him to permit the marriage of Francisco and Dolores.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.