The Princess of New York (1921)

Melodrama | 7 August 1921

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HISTORY

Although copyright records state the film was five reels in length, and the 3 Dec 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review similarly cited a length of 4,594 feet, other sources varied. The 13 Aug 1921 Moving Picture World and 20 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News stated the film was 6,000 feet (six reels), while the 22 Jul 1921 Var review and 1 Oct 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review claimed it was even longer, at seven reels (6,287 feet).
       On 19 Dec 1919, Var announced that Famous Players-Lasky Corp. planned to produce a film version of Cosmo Hamilton’s 1911 novel, The Princess of New York. Although the picture was expected to be the “second starring vehicle” for British actress Violet Heming, she did not remain with the project.
       A news item in the 12 Feb 1921 Moving Picture World announced that The Princess of New York would be British director Donald Crisp’s next production under his contract with Famous Players-Lasky Corp. Crisp and his assistant, Claude H. Mitchell, were said to be scouting locations in Spain and Italy, at that time. According to the 12 Mar 1921 Moving Picture World, location scouting was still underway in Italy and the French Riviera, and production was not expected to begin “for some weeks.” The 26 Mar 1921 issue of Motion Picture News noted that set construction had begun ten days earlier at the newly erected Famous Players-Lasky studio in Islington, England. Crisp had reportedly selected locations in Spain and Southern France, but it is unclear whether or not filming took place there. ... More Less

Although copyright records state the film was five reels in length, and the 3 Dec 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review similarly cited a length of 4,594 feet, other sources varied. The 13 Aug 1921 Moving Picture World and 20 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News stated the film was 6,000 feet (six reels), while the 22 Jul 1921 Var review and 1 Oct 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review claimed it was even longer, at seven reels (6,287 feet).
       On 19 Dec 1919, Var announced that Famous Players-Lasky Corp. planned to produce a film version of Cosmo Hamilton’s 1911 novel, The Princess of New York. Although the picture was expected to be the “second starring vehicle” for British actress Violet Heming, she did not remain with the project.
       A news item in the 12 Feb 1921 Moving Picture World announced that The Princess of New York would be British director Donald Crisp’s next production under his contract with Famous Players-Lasky Corp. Crisp and his assistant, Claude H. Mitchell, were said to be scouting locations in Spain and Italy, at that time. According to the 12 Mar 1921 Moving Picture World, location scouting was still underway in Italy and the French Riviera, and production was not expected to begin “for some weeks.” The 26 Mar 1921 issue of Motion Picture News noted that set construction had begun ten days earlier at the newly erected Famous Players-Lasky studio in Islington, England. Crisp had reportedly selected locations in Spain and Southern France, but it is unclear whether or not filming took place there.
       Principal photography was underway as of 9 Apr 1921, according to a Motion Picture News item of the same date, and completed by 21 May 1921, as noted in that day’s Motion Picture News. A 30 Apr 1921 Moving Picture World brief stated that filming took place at Oxford University in Oxford, England, with scenes featuring Oriel College. Other “settings” were said to include “the quaint old Temple in London’s legal corner…the Bow Street police court, and the lounge of a famous Strand hotel.”
       A 12 Aug 1921 news item in the Call [Perth, Australia] noted that British author Thomas Burke, who notoriously “look[ed] with disfavor on motion pictures,” visited the set twice and was “converted” by the experience. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Call [Perth, Australia]
12 Aug 1921
p. 7.
Exhibitors Herald
3 Sep 1921
p. 79.
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Oct 1921
p. 1284.
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 Dec 1921
p. 60.
Motion Picture News
26 Mar 1921
p. 2226.
Motion Picture News
9 Apr 1921
p. 2463.
Motion Picture News
21 May 1921
p. 3162.
Motion Picture News
20 Aug 1921
p. 980.
Moving Picture World
12 Feb 1921
p. 811.
Moving Picture World
5 Mar 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
12 Mar 1921
p. 169.
Moving Picture World
30 Apr 1921
p. 952.
Moving Picture World
13 Aug 1921
p. 733.
The New York Clipper
17 Dec 1919
p. 9.
Truth [Sydney]
2 Oct 1921
p. 11.
Variety
19 Dec 1919.
---
Variety
22 Jul 1921.
---
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 August 1921
Production Date:
began late Mar or early Apr 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 August 1921
Copyright Number:
LP16845
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,287
Length(in reels):
7
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

American heiress Helen Stanton, while visiting London, England, is introduced to the Merethams, people of title but of bad repute. She meets Geoffrey Kingsward, who falls in love with Helen and tries to warn her but is unable to gain her confidence. Sir George induces his son, Allan, to woo Helen and thereby recoup the family fortune; when Sir George hears of her father's bankruptcy, he persuades her to pawn some jewels and lend him the money, with which he absconds. Helen is about to be arrested when Geoffrey comes to her aid; meanwhile, a letter arrives contradicting the report of her father's bankruptcy and advising her to marry ... +


American heiress Helen Stanton, while visiting London, England, is introduced to the Merethams, people of title but of bad repute. She meets Geoffrey Kingsward, who falls in love with Helen and tries to warn her but is unable to gain her confidence. Sir George induces his son, Allan, to woo Helen and thereby recoup the family fortune; when Sir George hears of her father's bankruptcy, he persuades her to pawn some jewels and lend him the money, with which he absconds. Helen is about to be arrested when Geoffrey comes to her aid; meanwhile, a letter arrives contradicting the report of her father's bankruptcy and advising her to marry Geoffrey. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.