The Reckless Lady (1926)

Melodrama | 24 January 1926

Director:

Howard Higgin

Writer:

Sada Cowan

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

Paul F. Maschke

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
31 Jan 1926
---
New York Times
25 Jan 1926
p. 21
Variety
27 Jan 1926
p. 42
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Robert Kane
Pres
WRITER
Scen
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Robert M. Haas
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
PRODUCTION MISC
Joseph C. Boyle
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Reckless Lady by Philip Hamilton Gibbs (London, 1924).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 January 1926
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 24 Jan 1926
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
27 January 1926
LP22331
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,336
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Mrs. Fleming, a young wife and mother, has an affair with Feodor, a Russian scoundrel who has paid off her gambling debts. Her husband discovers the liaison and divorces her. Mrs. Fleming then goes to Monte Carlo with her daughter, Sylvia, and supports herself by careful gambling. Several years pass. Feodor comes to Monaco and meets Sylvia, who arouses his lustful nature. Mrs. Fleming learns of his interest in her daughter, but Feodor threatens to reveal her past if she stands in his way. Mrs. Fleming tries to win enough at the gambling tables to get Sylvia out of the country, but she loses everything. She is about to kill herself when her former husband fortuitously arrives and prevents her from doing so. Mrs. Fleming finally tells Sylvia of the past, and the girl becomes immediately disgusted with Feodor. The elder Flemings are reunited, and Sylvia settles her affections on a fine young fellow named ...

More Less

Mrs. Fleming, a young wife and mother, has an affair with Feodor, a Russian scoundrel who has paid off her gambling debts. Her husband discovers the liaison and divorces her. Mrs. Fleming then goes to Monte Carlo with her daughter, Sylvia, and supports herself by careful gambling. Several years pass. Feodor comes to Monaco and meets Sylvia, who arouses his lustful nature. Mrs. Fleming learns of his interest in her daughter, but Feodor threatens to reveal her past if she stands in his way. Mrs. Fleming tries to win enough at the gambling tables to get Sylvia out of the country, but she loses everything. She is about to kill herself when her former husband fortuitously arrives and prevents her from doing so. Mrs. Fleming finally tells Sylvia of the past, and the girl becomes immediately disgusted with Feodor. The elder Flemings are reunited, and Sylvia settles her affections on a fine young fellow named Ralph.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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