Hey, Rookie (1944)

71 or 77 mins | Comedy-drama | 9 March 1944

Director:

Charles Barton

Producer:

Irving Briskin

Cinematographer:

L. W. O'Connell

Editor:

James Sweeney

Production Designer:

Lionel Banks

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The film credits note that this production was originally "produced on the stage by the Original Yard Bird Club of Fort MacArthur for the benefit of the Athletic and Recreation Fund of Fort MacArthur, CA." The credits add that the title Hey, Rookie was originated by John Percy Halloway Walker. According to the Var review, the army musical played the Belasco Theater in Los Angeles for thirty-six weeks. The SAB credits Buddy Yarus in two different roles. Some modern sources erroneously include this title in the filmography of producer and one-time actor Robert Evans. Hey, Rookie marked the feature film debit of actor-comedian Jack Gilford. ...

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The film credits note that this production was originally "produced on the stage by the Original Yard Bird Club of Fort MacArthur for the benefit of the Athletic and Recreation Fund of Fort MacArthur, CA." The credits add that the title Hey, Rookie was originated by John Percy Halloway Walker. According to the Var review, the army musical played the Belasco Theater in Los Angeles for thirty-six weeks. The SAB credits Buddy Yarus in two different roles. Some modern sources erroneously include this title in the filmography of producer and one-time actor Robert Evans. Hey, Rookie marked the feature film debit of actor-comedian Jack Gilford.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 May 1944
p. 3, 6
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1943
p. 12
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 1944
p. 4
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 May 1944
p. 1877
Variety
12 Apr 1944
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Mus rec
Sd eng
DANCE
Dance dir
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Hey, Rookie by E. B. Colvan and Doris Colvan, as presented by the original Yard Bird Club of Fort MacArthur, CA.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
SONGS
"It's Great to Be in Uniform," "There Goes Taps," "Take a Chance," "It's a Swelluva Life in the Army" and "When the Yard Birds Come to Town," words and music by Sgt. J. C. Lewis, Jr.; "Hey, Rookie," "Streamlined Sheik" and "You're Good for My Morale," words and music by Henry Myers, Edward Eliscu and Jay Gorney.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 March 1944
Production Date:
30 Aug--2 Oct 1943
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
31 December 1943
LP12494
Duration(in mins):
71 or 77
Length(in feet):
7,033
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

After he is drafted into the armed forces, musical comedy producer Jim Lighter is sent to an induction center at Fort MacArthur, California. There he meets fellow rookies Bert and Pudge Pfeiffer, who announce to the camp that he is a famous Broadway producer. Despite the fact that Jim has become disillusioned with the theater, Bert and Pudge suggest that he produce a camp show. Noting that morale is low due to insufficient recreation for the men, Colonel Robbins embraces the idea and orders Jim to produce the show. Jim's visions for a lavish production are shattered when the colonel orders him to restrict his performers to army talent and limits his budget to $209. Jim has already written his former sweetheart, showgirl Winnie Clark, about his extravaganza, however, and when Winnie reads his letter, she embarks upon a tour of the army camps along the Pacific Coast. En route, she discovers that her mother had deliberately sabotaged her relationship with Jim and vows to reconcile with him. When Winnie arrives at the army camp, however, the colonel assigns her to assist with the show, thus earning Jim's enmity. Jim's ego is further bruised when Winnie's mother notifies the newspapers that Winnie has arrived to save the show. Despite the many interruptions dictated by army routine, Jim puts together the show, but just as he readies for the debut, the general arrives for an inspection and the performance is postponed for war games. After Jim's crew is beaten soundly by their enemy team, the colonel advances the date of the revue so that the general will be able to attend. Although unprepared, ...

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After he is drafted into the armed forces, musical comedy producer Jim Lighter is sent to an induction center at Fort MacArthur, California. There he meets fellow rookies Bert and Pudge Pfeiffer, who announce to the camp that he is a famous Broadway producer. Despite the fact that Jim has become disillusioned with the theater, Bert and Pudge suggest that he produce a camp show. Noting that morale is low due to insufficient recreation for the men, Colonel Robbins embraces the idea and orders Jim to produce the show. Jim's visions for a lavish production are shattered when the colonel orders him to restrict his performers to army talent and limits his budget to $209. Jim has already written his former sweetheart, showgirl Winnie Clark, about his extravaganza, however, and when Winnie reads his letter, she embarks upon a tour of the army camps along the Pacific Coast. En route, she discovers that her mother had deliberately sabotaged her relationship with Jim and vows to reconcile with him. When Winnie arrives at the army camp, however, the colonel assigns her to assist with the show, thus earning Jim's enmity. Jim's ego is further bruised when Winnie's mother notifies the newspapers that Winnie has arrived to save the show. Despite the many interruptions dictated by army routine, Jim puts together the show, but just as he readies for the debut, the general arrives for an inspection and the performance is postponed for war games. After Jim's crew is beaten soundly by their enemy team, the colonel advances the date of the revue so that the general will be able to attend. Although unprepared, Jim and the other entertainers take to the stage. The performance is a hit, and when Winnie appears in the finale, dressed as a WAC, she and Jim sing a duet and reconcile. After the curtain falls, Winnie informs Jim that the uniform is not a costume and that she has joined the army and is now a rookie, too.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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