Mis dos amores (1938)

75 or 80 mins | Drama | 1938

Director:

Nick Grinde

Writer:

Milton Raison

Cinematographer:

Arthur Martinelli

Editor:

Martin G. Cohn

Production Designer:

Ralph Berger

Production Company:

Cobian Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Mi primer amor . MPH refers to it by the English translation of the Spanish title, "My Two Loves." The MPH review also notes that the picture's producer, Rafael Ramos Cobián, had recently signed a contract with Twentieth Century-Fox to make four Spanish-language pictures a year. Reviews and news items note that Mis dos amores was the first of a new series of films aimed at the Spanish-language markets in the United States, Central and South America that would star Tito Guízar, who was playing his first dramatic starring role in a North American film. The MPH and Var reviewers both wrote favorably about the film and predicted that it would do well in all Spanish-langauge markets. The Var review incorrectly credits costumer William Bridgehouse with the ... More Less

The working title of this film was Mi primer amor . MPH refers to it by the English translation of the Spanish title, "My Two Loves." The MPH review also notes that the picture's producer, Rafael Ramos Cobián, had recently signed a contract with Twentieth Century-Fox to make four Spanish-language pictures a year. Reviews and news items note that Mis dos amores was the first of a new series of films aimed at the Spanish-language markets in the United States, Central and South America that would star Tito Guízar, who was playing his first dramatic starring role in a North American film. The MPH and Var reviewers both wrote favorably about the film and predicted that it would do well in all Spanish-langauge markets. The Var review incorrectly credits costumer William Bridgehouse with the cinematography. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Aug 38
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
1 Sep 38
p. 15.
Motion Picture Herald
20 Aug 38
p. 47, 50
Variety
17 Aug 38
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Spanish dial
Spanish dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Madre," "Ouiubo ouiubo?" "Jalando jalando," "Mis dos amores," "Tú nada más para mí" and "Mi primer amor," music by Tito Guízar, lyrics by Nenette Noriega
"Rosas y mujeres" and "Vuélveme a besar," music and lyrics by Leopoldo González.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
My Two Loves
Mi primer amor
Release Date:
1938
Premiere Information:
New York preview: 11 August 1938
San Juan, Puerto Rico opening: 4 October 1938
Los Angeles opening: 9 May 1939
Production Date:
began June 1938 at the General Service Studios
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75 or 80
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
Spanish
PCA No:
4465
SYNOPSIS

Rita Santiago's father, Don Antonio, stubbornly refuses to give permission for her to marry Julio Bertolin, a struggling medical student, because he wants his daughter to marry a rich Brazilian. Because of this, Julio leaves medical school and determines to gain wealth and position for himself by becoming a singer. He soon moves to Los Angeles and becomes a popular singer in a Latin American cabaret owned by "El Chato." A dancer at the cabaret, Ana Celia Ramos, falls in love with Julio, and angers El Chato, who is in love with her and extremely jealous. When he confronts Ana about her feelings for Julio, El Chato becomes so enraged that he accidentally kills her, then places the blame on Julio. Julio is then arrested for the crime, but is eventually cleared of the crime by Anita, Ana's six-year-old daughter. The girl reveals that just before Ana died, she told her daughter her killer's ... +


Rita Santiago's father, Don Antonio, stubbornly refuses to give permission for her to marry Julio Bertolin, a struggling medical student, because he wants his daughter to marry a rich Brazilian. Because of this, Julio leaves medical school and determines to gain wealth and position for himself by becoming a singer. He soon moves to Los Angeles and becomes a popular singer in a Latin American cabaret owned by "El Chato." A dancer at the cabaret, Ana Celia Ramos, falls in love with Julio, and angers El Chato, who is in love with her and extremely jealous. When he confronts Ana about her feelings for Julio, El Chato becomes so enraged that he accidentally kills her, then places the blame on Julio. Julio is then arrested for the crime, but is eventually cleared of the crime by Anita, Ana's six-year-old daughter. The girl reveals that just before Ana died, she told her daughter her killer's identity. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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