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HISTORY

The 7 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World announced that Inspiration Pictures, Inc., had acquired screen rights to Hubert Osborne’s 1922 play, Shore Leave; A Sea-goin' Comedy in Three Acts, which reportedly had a long run on Broadway. Richard Barthelmess was set to star. The 18 Mar 1925 Var indicated that the rights were purchased for $25,000.
       According to the 28 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World, Dorothy Mackaill was signed to co-star in the picture, and First National Pictures, Inc. was on board to distribute.
       Principal photography began in New York City in late Apr 1925 under the direction of John S. Robertson, as stated in the 2 May 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review. Robertson’s wife and regular collaborator, Josephine Lovett, was credited for writing the scenario. The 9 May 1925 Moving Picture World reported that the first scenes were filmed on location at the New York Aquarium, with interiors to be made at Tec-Art Studios, Inc., located at 344 West 44th Street. The U.S. Navy offered their cooperation, and additional exteriors were scheduled to be filmed “on board various battleships of the Atlantic fleet and on the Massachusetts coast.”
       According to the 11 Jul 1925 Moving Picture World, principal photography was completed sometime in the previous two weeks, and the picture was currently being edited.
       The 13 Aug 1925 FD announced that Shore Leave would open with over 100 showings during the week of 6 Sep 1925. However, the 26 Aug 1925 and 2 Sep 1925 Var noted openings in several cities as early as 24 Aug 1925.
       The ... More Less

The 7 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World announced that Inspiration Pictures, Inc., had acquired screen rights to Hubert Osborne’s 1922 play, Shore Leave; A Sea-goin' Comedy in Three Acts, which reportedly had a long run on Broadway. Richard Barthelmess was set to star. The 18 Mar 1925 Var indicated that the rights were purchased for $25,000.
       According to the 28 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World, Dorothy Mackaill was signed to co-star in the picture, and First National Pictures, Inc. was on board to distribute.
       Principal photography began in New York City in late Apr 1925 under the direction of John S. Robertson, as stated in the 2 May 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review. Robertson’s wife and regular collaborator, Josephine Lovett, was credited for writing the scenario. The 9 May 1925 Moving Picture World reported that the first scenes were filmed on location at the New York Aquarium, with interiors to be made at Tec-Art Studios, Inc., located at 344 West 44th Street. The U.S. Navy offered their cooperation, and additional exteriors were scheduled to be filmed “on board various battleships of the Atlantic fleet and on the Massachusetts coast.”
       According to the 11 Jul 1925 Moving Picture World, principal photography was completed sometime in the previous two weeks, and the picture was currently being edited.
       The 13 Aug 1925 FD announced that Shore Leave would open with over 100 showings during the week of 6 Sep 1925. However, the 26 Aug 1925 and 2 Sep 1925 Var noted openings in several cities as early as 24 Aug 1925.
       The Los Angeles opening at Loew’s State Theatre in early Sep 1925 made an “excellent showing,” with box-office receipts from its first week in release totaling $25,500, as stated in the 9 Sep 1925 Var. Shore Leave opened at the Mark Strand Theatre in New York City the week of 13 Sep 1925, according to the 16 Sep 1925 Var review, which praised the picture as among the best in which Barthelmess had been featured. His characterization of the sailor was deemed “uncompromising.” Mackaill was also noted for her “sincere and consistent performance.”
       For information on other films based on the Hubert Osborne play, please consult the entry for the 1936 RKO film Follow the Fleet, directed by Mark Sandrich and starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
2 May 1925
p. 20, 25.
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Sep 1925
p. 49.
Film Daily
7 Jun 1925
p. 140.
Film Daily
13 Aug 1925
p. 8.
Film Daily
27 Sep 1925.
---
Moving Picture World
7 Mar 1925
p. 75.
Moving Picture World
28 Mar 1925
p. 386.
Moving Picture World
9 May 1925
p. 229.
Moving Picture World
11 Jul 1925
p. 187.
New York Times
14 Sep 1925.
---
Variety
18 Mar 1925
p. 31.
Variety
26 Aug 1925
p. 11, 54.
Variety
2 Sep 1925
p. 17.
Variety
9 Sep 1925
p. 30.
Variety
16 Sep 1925
p. 40.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Titles
Art titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Settings
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Shore Leave
A Sea-goin' Comedy in Three Acts by Hubert Osborne, as produced by David Belasco (New York, 8 Aug 1922).
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 13 September 1925 at the Marchk Strand Theatre
Production Date:
late April--late June 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Inspiration Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 August 1925
Copyright Number:
LP21709
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,856
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The fleet anchors in a small New England port, and while on shore leave "Bilge" Smith, a hardened, easygoing sailor, meets Connie Martin, the village dressmaker. Smith flirts with her, and Connie, who has never had a sweetheart, takes the flirtation seriously. Smith promises to return to her, and in his absence Connie has an old ship, left to her by her father, converted into a tearoom. The fleet returns, and Connie, not knowing Smith's first name, invites all the Smiths in the fleet to a party. Bilge Smith comes and, at first, does not remember Connie. When he realizes how serious she is about him, he proposes, but, learning of her newly found prosperity, he weighs anchor, refusing to live off a rich woman. Connie later writes to Smith and tells him that she has been reduced to poverty. He quickly returns to her and finds that she still owns the ship. Believing himself to have been tricked, Smith is preparing to leave when Connie haltingly tells him that she has put the ship in trust for her first baby, provided that the child's last name is Smith. Smith decides to stay and marry ... +


The fleet anchors in a small New England port, and while on shore leave "Bilge" Smith, a hardened, easygoing sailor, meets Connie Martin, the village dressmaker. Smith flirts with her, and Connie, who has never had a sweetheart, takes the flirtation seriously. Smith promises to return to her, and in his absence Connie has an old ship, left to her by her father, converted into a tearoom. The fleet returns, and Connie, not knowing Smith's first name, invites all the Smiths in the fleet to a party. Bilge Smith comes and, at first, does not remember Connie. When he realizes how serious she is about him, he proposes, but, learning of her newly found prosperity, he weighs anchor, refusing to live off a rich woman. Connie later writes to Smith and tells him that she has been reduced to poverty. He quickly returns to her and finds that she still owns the ship. Believing himself to have been tricked, Smith is preparing to leave when Connie haltingly tells him that she has put the ship in trust for her first baby, provided that the child's last name is Smith. Smith decides to stay and marry Connie. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.