Showgirl in Hollywood (1930)

77 mins | Musical, Comedy-drama | April 1930

Director:

Mervyn LeRoy

Producer:

Robert North

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Peter Fritch

Production Designer:

Jack Okey

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Following the success of the 1928 novel and the First National Pictures, Inc. film adaptation, Show Girl (1928, see entry), author Joseph Patrick McEvoy was commissioned to write a follow-up novel to be titled Show Girl in Hollywood, which First National Pictures would again produce, according to the 21 Sep 1929 Motion Picture News. ^ The 29 May 1929 Var previously stated that Show Girl in Hollywood would initially be published as a serial by Liberty magazine, before being released as a novel by Simon & Schuster in the fall of that year. The storyline was inspired by a research trip made by McEvoy to an unnamed major film studio in Hollywood, CA. There, the author attended a luncheon with studio executives, whose conversations inspired the film’s themes.
       Alice White was set to reprise the role of “Dixie Dugan” in the picture, as noted in the 5 Oct 1929 Motion Picture News. Harvey Thew and Robert Lord were said to be writing the adaption and dialogue, but only Thew received credit for his contribution.
       Principal photography began in early Nov 1929 at First National Studios in Burbank, CA, according to the 9 Nov 1929 Motion Picture News.
       The 20 Nov 1929 Var reported that filmmakers wanted an “average fan” opinion of show business, and hired seventeen-year-old Barbara Lehman to offer an “outsiders” impression of Hollywood. Lehman was reportedly billed as a technical advisor.
       The 9 Oct 1929 and 11 Dec 1929 issues of Var added Doris McMahon and Freeman Lang to the cast. The 25 Apr 1930 ... More Less

Following the success of the 1928 novel and the First National Pictures, Inc. film adaptation, Show Girl (1928, see entry), author Joseph Patrick McEvoy was commissioned to write a follow-up novel to be titled Show Girl in Hollywood, which First National Pictures would again produce, according to the 21 Sep 1929 Motion Picture News. ^ The 29 May 1929 Var previously stated that Show Girl in Hollywood would initially be published as a serial by Liberty magazine, before being released as a novel by Simon & Schuster in the fall of that year. The storyline was inspired by a research trip made by McEvoy to an unnamed major film studio in Hollywood, CA. There, the author attended a luncheon with studio executives, whose conversations inspired the film’s themes.
       Alice White was set to reprise the role of “Dixie Dugan” in the picture, as noted in the 5 Oct 1929 Motion Picture News. Harvey Thew and Robert Lord were said to be writing the adaption and dialogue, but only Thew received credit for his contribution.
       Principal photography began in early Nov 1929 at First National Studios in Burbank, CA, according to the 9 Nov 1929 Motion Picture News.
       The 20 Nov 1929 Var reported that filmmakers wanted an “average fan” opinion of show business, and hired seventeen-year-old Barbara Lehman to offer an “outsiders” impression of Hollywood. Lehman was reportedly billed as a technical advisor.
       The 9 Oct 1929 and 11 Dec 1929 issues of Var added Doris McMahon and Freeman Lang to the cast. The 25 Apr 1930 FD noted that Edward Stevenson served as costume designer on the film.
       The 21 Dec 1929 Motion Picture News indicated that principal photography was recently completed.
       The 26 Mar 1930 Var announced that Show Girl in Hollywood would open in Pittsburgh, PA, simultaneously at the Stanley and Enright Theatres during Easter week (Easter fell on 20 Apr 1930). The 30 Apr 1930 Var reported that the New York City opening at the Winter Garden Theatre would be held on 2 May 1930.
       The 4 May 1930 FD review deemed the picture “full of life and color,” while the 14 May 1930 Var complained that Show Girl in Hollywood was “only occasionally funny,” put praised the “studio atmosphere.” The Jun 1930 Screenland listed the picture as one of its “Six Most Important Films of the Month.”
       Var and some other contemporary sources listed the title as Show Girl in Hollywood. The film also was made by Warner Bros. in a French-language version, Le masque d'Hollywood, directed by Clarence Badger and Jean Daumery and starring Suzy Vernon and Geymond Vital (1931, see entry). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
17 Nov 1929
p. 10.
Film Daily
25 Apr 1930
p. 12.
Film Daily
4 May 1930
p. 10.
Motion Picture News
21 Sep 1929
p. 1056.
Motion Picture News
5 Oct 1929
p. 1199.
Motion Picture News
9 Nov 1929
p. 33.
Motion Picture News
21 Dec 1929
p. 25.
New York Times
5 May 1930
p. 27.
Screenland
Mar 1930
p. 19.
Screenland
Jun 1930
p. 85.
Variety
29 May 1929
p. 52, 55.
Variety
9 Oct 1929
p. 31.
Variety
30 Oct 1929
p. 20.
Variety
20 Nov 1929
p. 1.
Variety
11 Dec 1929
p. 28.
Variety
25 Dec 1929
p. 8.
Variety
26 Mar 1930
p. 26.
Variety
30 Apr 1930
p. 4.
Variety
14 May 1930
p. 39.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus cond
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Hollywood Girl by Joseph Patrick McEvoy (New York, 1929).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Hang On To A Rainbow," "I've Got My Eye On You" and "There's A Tear For Every Smile In Hollywood," words by Bud Green, music by Sammy Stept.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Show Girl in Hollywood
Release Date:
April 1930
Premiere Information:
Pittsburgh opening: week of 20 April 1930
New York opening at the Winter Garden Theatre: 2 May 1930
Production Date:
early November--late December 1929
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 April 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1263
Physical Properties:
Sound
Vitaphone
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
77
Length(in feet):
7,213
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Jimmy Doyle's Broadway musical is a flop, he takes his rejected star, Dixie Dugan, to a nightclub where she does her number again. Buelow, a Hollywood film director, sees her and persuades her to come to filmland for a part in his new picture. In Hollywood, Dixie meets Donna Harris, a down-and-out actress who is trying to put up a front; and Otis, the producer, is tired of Buelow and fires him. He discovers that Jimmy is the author of the show he is producing and hires him; but when Dixie gets the leading role, she becomes temperamental and conceited, demanding a new director and changes in the story. After Otis fires her and cancels the picture, Donna, also having lost her job, attempts suicide but is saved by Dixie and Jimmy. The film is finished and is a big success, ensuring happiness for ... +


When Jimmy Doyle's Broadway musical is a flop, he takes his rejected star, Dixie Dugan, to a nightclub where she does her number again. Buelow, a Hollywood film director, sees her and persuades her to come to filmland for a part in his new picture. In Hollywood, Dixie meets Donna Harris, a down-and-out actress who is trying to put up a front; and Otis, the producer, is tired of Buelow and fires him. He discovers that Jimmy is the author of the show he is producing and hires him; but when Dixie gets the leading role, she becomes temperamental and conceited, demanding a new director and changes in the story. After Otis fires her and cancels the picture, Donna, also having lost her job, attempts suicide but is saved by Dixie and Jimmy. The film is finished and is a big success, ensuring happiness for all. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.