La melodía prohibida (1933)

Drama | 1933

Director:

Frank R. Strayer

Producer:

John Stone

Cinematographer:

Harry Jackson

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The plot summary was based on a dialogue continuity and a script in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are in the UCLA Arts-- Special Collections Library. The title was translated in reviews as "Forbidden Melody." The film was exhibited in Los Angeles under the title La canción prohibida . The NYT review credits Tom Patricola as a cast member; however, no information in the studio records or in other reviews confirms his participation in the ... More Less

The plot summary was based on a dialogue continuity and a script in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are in the UCLA Arts-- Special Collections Library. The title was translated in reviews as "Forbidden Melody." The film was exhibited in Los Angeles under the title La canción prohibida . The NYT review credits Tom Patricola as a cast member; however, no information in the studio records or in other reviews confirms his participation in the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
28 Mar 34
p. 9.
International Photographer
Mar 33
p. 21.
New York Times
4 Oct 33
p. 27.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Dirección [Dir]
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Adaptación cinematográfica de [Scr]
Adaptación cinematográfica de [Scr]
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Asst cam
MUSIC
Dirección musical [Mus dir]
SOURCES
SONGS
"Pais ideal (The Islands Are Calling Me)," "Siempre (Till the End of Time)," "La canción del paria (Derelict Song)" and "La melodía prohibida," music by Harry Akst, lyrics by L. Wolfe Gilbert, Spanish translation by José Mojica and Enrique Jardiel Poncela
"Como tú y yo" and "Cuando me vaya (When I Go Away)," music and lyrics by María Grever.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
La canción prohibida
Release Date:
1933
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 13 September 1933
Production Date:
21 February--11 March 1933
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
Spanish
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On the morning of their wedding, Kalu and Tuila romp joyously on their secluded South Pacific island. A pleasure yacht arrives, and the island's colonial governor invites the tourists to the solemn nuptials, where Kalu performs the "Forbidden Melody," a song which a man sings to his beloved only once in his life. In the jungle, Kalu meets Peggy, who arrived on the yacht, and commends her for her dancing skills, which she admirably displayed at the primitive wedding the night before. She asks him to sing the "Forbidden Melody," but he tells her that to do so would be taboo. A village child tells Tuila that Kalu was seen with a white woman in his arms, and Tuila finds Peggy to warn her to leave alone the innocent native boy, who is a diversion for Peggy at best. Kalu meets Peggy's entourage, including Bob Grant, a nightclub promoter who compliments him on his singing and offers him a contract to perform at his cabaret in San Francisco. Peggy later finds Kalu in the Thunder God's cave, where he pays obeisance. Peggy insists on entering the holy place despite Kalu's protests, and she convinces him that the Thunder God approves of their love. In San Francisco, Kalu sings his "Forbidden Melody" to jazz accompaniment. Peggy, already bored with her latest project of "civilizing the savage," flirts with a pro football player in the audience. At a party at Peggy's house, Kalu expresses his disappointment that he can never see her alone, and Peggy admits that she doesn't love him. Kalu, despondent, goes to a sleazy bar and gets drunk. When he hears ... +


On the morning of their wedding, Kalu and Tuila romp joyously on their secluded South Pacific island. A pleasure yacht arrives, and the island's colonial governor invites the tourists to the solemn nuptials, where Kalu performs the "Forbidden Melody," a song which a man sings to his beloved only once in his life. In the jungle, Kalu meets Peggy, who arrived on the yacht, and commends her for her dancing skills, which she admirably displayed at the primitive wedding the night before. She asks him to sing the "Forbidden Melody," but he tells her that to do so would be taboo. A village child tells Tuila that Kalu was seen with a white woman in his arms, and Tuila finds Peggy to warn her to leave alone the innocent native boy, who is a diversion for Peggy at best. Kalu meets Peggy's entourage, including Bob Grant, a nightclub promoter who compliments him on his singing and offers him a contract to perform at his cabaret in San Francisco. Peggy later finds Kalu in the Thunder God's cave, where he pays obeisance. Peggy insists on entering the holy place despite Kalu's protests, and she convinces him that the Thunder God approves of their love. In San Francisco, Kalu sings his "Forbidden Melody" to jazz accompaniment. Peggy, already bored with her latest project of "civilizing the savage," flirts with a pro football player in the audience. At a party at Peggy's house, Kalu expresses his disappointment that he can never see her alone, and Peggy admits that she doesn't love him. Kalu, despondent, goes to a sleazy bar and gets drunk. When he hears his "Forbidden Melody," on the radio, he cries out and runs outside. Believing that he's heard Tuila's love call, he runs into the street, but the call was a siren from a fire engine and it strikes and kills him. Back on the island, the governor listens sadly to a recording of the dead prince singing an exotic song on the radio. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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