La cruz y la espada (1934)

73 mins | Drama | 1934

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Romance de California and Oro de California . The words for the song "Gratia plena" were from a poem by Mexican poet Amado Nervo. During the film's pre-production period, Carmen Samaniego, Carlos Villarías and María Calvo were announced as cast members, but their participation in the completed film has not been confirmed. Not long after making this film, star José Mojica became a Franciscan priest. According to DV , the film "has been one of Fox's biggest grossers among Spanish versions." DV also stated that Fox at one time thought about producing an English version, and that the version which opened in Los Angeles had English ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Romance de California and Oro de California . The words for the song "Gratia plena" were from a poem by Mexican poet Amado Nervo. During the film's pre-production period, Carmen Samaniego, Carlos Villarías and María Calvo were announced as cast members, but their participation in the completed film has not been confirmed. Not long after making this film, star José Mojica became a Franciscan priest. According to DV , the film "has been one of Fox's biggest grossers among Spanish versions." DV also stated that Fox at one time thought about producing an English version, and that the version which opened in Los Angeles had English titles. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Jul 34
p. 1.
New York Times
5 Feb 34
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dirección de [Dir]
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Obra original de [Orig story by]
Adaptación cinematográfica de [Scr]
Adaptación cinematográfica de [Scr]
MUSIC
Dirección musical de [Mus dir]
SOURCES
SONGS
"Singsong of the Children," "Song of the Grapes," "Song of the Miller," "Song of the Muleteers," "Song of the Miners" and "Jota No. 3," music by Troy Sanders, lyrics by José Mojica
"Gratia plena," words by Amado Nervo, music by Mario Talavera
"Funeral," words and music by Ernesto Lecuona
+
SONGS
"Singsong of the Children," "Song of the Grapes," "Song of the Miller," "Song of the Muleteers," "Song of the Miners" and "Jota No. 3," music by Troy Sanders, lyrics by José Mojica
"Gratia plena," words by Amado Nervo, music by Mario Talavera
"Funeral," words and music by Ernesto Lecuona
"Alleluia," words and music by Frederick Hummel
"Carmela," Spanish California folksong.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Romance de California
Oro de California
Release Date:
1934
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 1 February 1934
Production Date:
October 1933
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
Spanish
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In California, in the late eighteenth century, José Antonio Romero lives in a village near one of Junípero Serra's Franciscan missions. When gold is discovered, José gets a group of men together to form a prospecting expedition. José goes to talk to his good friend, Brother Francisco, and tells him that he wants to find gold so that he can give a good life to his beloved, Carmela. Meanwhile, Carmela tells her aunt that she is not sure if she loves José. Bandits, led by El Mestizo, arrive at the mission and kidnap Carmela. Brother Francisco pursues then rescues her, and realizes that she is his friend José's beloved. At the chapel, Carmela is surprised to learn that her rescuer is Brother Francisco, and she asks why he gave up the world for a religious vocation. He tells her that it was because of his sorrow over a woman. Jaime arrives from the mining camp and tells Francisco that Esteban has been stabbed. Francisco volunteers to go to render medical aid and, on his way back from the camp, shelters from a storm in a cave where he discovers gold. Francisco then battles with temptation. His evil conscience tells him to take the beautiful Carmela and the gold. Francisco imagines that he goes to Carmela and tells her that he has burned his novitiate's clothing. However, Francisco overcomes these temptations and later writes to José telling him of the gold's location. In a cantina back at the village, a drunken local tells José that Carmela and Francisco have been seen flirting. José madly confronts Francisco, who denies all charges of infamy. After José attacks his old friend with a ... +


In California, in the late eighteenth century, José Antonio Romero lives in a village near one of Junípero Serra's Franciscan missions. When gold is discovered, José gets a group of men together to form a prospecting expedition. José goes to talk to his good friend, Brother Francisco, and tells him that he wants to find gold so that he can give a good life to his beloved, Carmela. Meanwhile, Carmela tells her aunt that she is not sure if she loves José. Bandits, led by El Mestizo, arrive at the mission and kidnap Carmela. Brother Francisco pursues then rescues her, and realizes that she is his friend José's beloved. At the chapel, Carmela is surprised to learn that her rescuer is Brother Francisco, and she asks why he gave up the world for a religious vocation. He tells her that it was because of his sorrow over a woman. Jaime arrives from the mining camp and tells Francisco that Esteban has been stabbed. Francisco volunteers to go to render medical aid and, on his way back from the camp, shelters from a storm in a cave where he discovers gold. Francisco then battles with temptation. His evil conscience tells him to take the beautiful Carmela and the gold. Francisco imagines that he goes to Carmela and tells her that he has burned his novitiate's clothing. However, Francisco overcomes these temptations and later writes to José telling him of the gold's location. In a cantina back at the village, a drunken local tells José that Carmela and Francisco have been seen flirting. José madly confronts Francisco, who denies all charges of infamy. After José attacks his old friend with a knife, Francisco tells him that Carmela is completely pure and José begs for the brother's forgiveness. Carmela arrives and Francisco says that José has asked him to sing at their wedding. At the ceremony, Francisco joyously sings their wedding song. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.