Slander the Woman (1923)

Melodrama | 16 April 1923

Full page view
HISTORY

The 11 Nov 1922 Moving Picture World announced that the "picturization" of the "romantic novel" The White Frontier "would soon be underway." The author, Jeffrey Deprend, agreed to withhold the publication of the book until the film was released. Slander the Woman, the film's ultimate title, was director Allen Holubar's second production with Associated First National Pictures, Inc., and his last, as he died the following year.
       Although the 4 Nov 1922 Motion Picture News noted that Holubar planned to shoot most of the exteriors for The White Frontier in Canada, the 25 Nov 1922 edition of the magazine announced that the production had gone instead to "the Sierra mountains in the vicinity of Truckee."
       In a column called “A Letter From Location” that ran in the May 1923 Picture-Play, actress Dorothy Phillips recounted her days in Truckee, CA, and her daily trips into the mountains to film exteriors for lander the Woman. The thirty-five members of the cast and crew left their Truckee hotel early in the morning and rode several miles up a narrow-gauge railroad to the Truckee River, which they crossed on a small pulley-operated cable car. The actors were made up on the train during the journey.
       Studio work was done at United Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to the 25 Nov 1922 Camera. ... More Less

The 11 Nov 1922 Moving Picture World announced that the "picturization" of the "romantic novel" The White Frontier "would soon be underway." The author, Jeffrey Deprend, agreed to withhold the publication of the book until the film was released. Slander the Woman, the film's ultimate title, was director Allen Holubar's second production with Associated First National Pictures, Inc., and his last, as he died the following year.
       Although the 4 Nov 1922 Motion Picture News noted that Holubar planned to shoot most of the exteriors for The White Frontier in Canada, the 25 Nov 1922 edition of the magazine announced that the production had gone instead to "the Sierra mountains in the vicinity of Truckee."
       In a column called “A Letter From Location” that ran in the May 1923 Picture-Play, actress Dorothy Phillips recounted her days in Truckee, CA, and her daily trips into the mountains to film exteriors for lander the Woman.
The thirty-five members of the cast and crew left their Truckee hotel early in the morning and rode several miles up a narrow-gauge railroad to the Truckee River, which they crossed on a small pulley-operated cable car. The actors were made up on the train during the journey.
       Studio work was done at United Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to the 25 Nov 1922 Camera. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
11 Nov 1922
p. 14.
Motion Picture News
4 Nov 1922
p. 2330.
Motion Picture News
25 Nov 1922
p. 2712.
Moving Picture World
11 Nov 1922.
---
Picture-Play
May 1923
p. 85, 100.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The White Frontier
Release Date:
16 April 1923
Production Date:
began November 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Allen Holubar Pictures
Copyright Date:
24 April 1923
Copyright Number:
LP18889
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,400
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Through circumstantial evidence, Yvonne Desmarest is branded by Judge Duroacher as the "other woman" in a sensational murder case. She retreats to her father's hunting lodge near Hudson Bay, Canada, where she meets Scarborough, an Indian girl, and Émile (an old trapper who becomes her protector). Realizing his error, Duroacher follows Yvonne, thus precipitating a series of events in which the judge is suspected of murdering Scarborough, and Émile injures Duroacher out of jealousy. Yvonne's name is cleared, as is that of Émile, who has been sought for many years on a murder charge. Yvonne and Duroacher realize their love for each ... +


Through circumstantial evidence, Yvonne Desmarest is branded by Judge Duroacher as the "other woman" in a sensational murder case. She retreats to her father's hunting lodge near Hudson Bay, Canada, where she meets Scarborough, an Indian girl, and Émile (an old trapper who becomes her protector). Realizing his error, Duroacher follows Yvonne, thus precipitating a series of events in which the judge is suspected of murdering Scarborough, and Émile injures Duroacher out of jealousy. Yvonne's name is cleared, as is that of Émile, who has been sought for many years on a murder charge. Yvonne and Duroacher realize their love for each other. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Rural


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.