El rey de los gitanos (1933)

82 mins | Comedy-drama, Musical, Romance | 1933

Full page view
HISTORY

The plot summary was based on a screen continuity in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen billing sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are in the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library. The film's working title was El zíngaro vagabundo. The running time listed above was calculated from footage given in NYSA records. ...

More Less

The plot summary was based on a screen continuity in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen billing sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are in the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library. The film's working title was El zíngaro vagabundo. The running time listed above was calculated from footage given in NYSA records.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
CM
Jun 1933
p. 320
Film Daily
31 May 1933
p. 7
International Photographer
1 Jan 1933
p. 21
New York Times
29 May 1933
p. 22
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Frank Strayer
Dirección de [Directed by]
PRODUCER
Prod, Prod
WRITERS
Adaptación cinematográfica de [Screenplay by]
Adaptación cinematográfica de [Screenplay by]
Versión española de [Spanish version by]
Dwight Cummings
Contr wrt
Robert M. Low
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
William Dietz
Cam op
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cuando el amor llama (Love Calls)," "Zíngaro vagabundo (Song of the Romany Band)," "Mansión sin amor (Without Love in a Palace of Dreams)" and "Serenata bufa (Serenade)," words by L. Wolfe Gilbert, music by Desider Josef Vecsei, translated into Spanish by José Mojica; "Canción del carnaval (Carnival Song)" and "Canción de la buenaventura (Fortune Telling Song)," words by L. Wolfe Gilbert, music by D. J. Vecsei, translated into Spanish by José López Rubio.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
El zíngaro vagabundo
Release Date:
1933
Premiere Information:
Barcelona, Spain opening: 23 May 1933; Los Angeles opening: 26 May 1933
Production Date:
16 Dec 1932--6 Jan 1933
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82
Length(in feet):
7,344
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
Spanish
SYNOPSIS

Princess María Louisa, bored with the stuffy and morose atmosphere of the court palace, dresses like a peasant girl and goes to the village fair with her maid, Renée, where she meets Karol, the King of the Gypsies. The Grand Duke Alejandro, her fiancé, who is more interested in affairs of the state than of the heart, pursues her and finds her kissing Karol, whom she then threatens to have imprisoned for his transgression. María Louisa loses her brooch, and Alejandro insists that Karol stole it. The coach driver finds the brooch and returns it to Alejandro; however, he continues to insist on Karol's guilt. Karol believes that he has been arrested for kissing the princess and so confesses to the crime. While serving his sentence of seven days of hard labor, he works in the royal kitchen, where he makes a "love salad" which María Louisa adores. When she discovers that he is the salad's creator, however, she retracts her praise. Renée reveals to the princess that she saw the coachman give the brooch to Alejandro, and María Louisa goes to apologize. She discovers Karol and Alejandro fighting, and Karol then escapes the palace, taking María Louisa captive. At the gypsy camp, María Louisa insists on working like the others. Remetz, also taken to the gypsy camp by force, escapes and alerts Alejandro, who arrives at the camp with an army. Karol and Alejandro duel in the woods, and after Alejandro shoots a hole in Karol's hat, he flees in fear of Karol's better aim. Karol orders that the gypsies break camp and tells María Louisa that their paths crossed ...

More Less

Princess María Louisa, bored with the stuffy and morose atmosphere of the court palace, dresses like a peasant girl and goes to the village fair with her maid, Renée, where she meets Karol, the King of the Gypsies. The Grand Duke Alejandro, her fiancé, who is more interested in affairs of the state than of the heart, pursues her and finds her kissing Karol, whom she then threatens to have imprisoned for his transgression. María Louisa loses her brooch, and Alejandro insists that Karol stole it. The coach driver finds the brooch and returns it to Alejandro; however, he continues to insist on Karol's guilt. Karol believes that he has been arrested for kissing the princess and so confesses to the crime. While serving his sentence of seven days of hard labor, he works in the royal kitchen, where he makes a "love salad" which María Louisa adores. When she discovers that he is the salad's creator, however, she retracts her praise. Renée reveals to the princess that she saw the coachman give the brooch to Alejandro, and María Louisa goes to apologize. She discovers Karol and Alejandro fighting, and Karol then escapes the palace, taking María Louisa captive. At the gypsy camp, María Louisa insists on working like the others. Remetz, also taken to the gypsy camp by force, escapes and alerts Alejandro, who arrives at the camp with an army. Karol and Alejandro duel in the woods, and after Alejandro shoots a hole in Karol's hat, he flees in fear of Karol's better aim. Karol orders that the gypsies break camp and tells María Louisa that their paths crossed happily but that he must move on. María Louisa sadly watches his caravan recede in the distance.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Tokyo Joe

According to a 10 Dec 1948 HR news item, 2d unit director Art Black and cameramen Joseph Biroc and Emil Oster, Jr. shot 40,000 feet of background ... >>

Frankenstein

Screen credits list "The Monster" as played by "?" in the opening cast list. The "?" is replaced by Boris Karloff's name in the end credits. Mary Shelley's ... >>

Top Gun

The following written prologue appears before the title: “On March 3, 1969 the United States Navy established an elite school for the top one percent of its pilots. Its ... >>

The Princess Bride

The synopsis and history for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Synopsis and history were written by Fitrah Hamid, a student at Georgia ... >>

Baby Face

According to Warner Bros. production records in the AMPAS Library file on the film, Baby Face was shot in eighteen days at a total cost of $187,000. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.