Smouldering Fires (1925)

83 mins | Drama | 18 January 1925

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HISTORY

Some exteriors were shot in Yosemite National Park, according to the 1 Oct 1924 FD and other sources. At least one source credits Leo E. Kuter as art director, while other sources credit E. E. Sheeley. The 10 Jan 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that Melville Brown was hired as a "gag" man and co-author.
       The 18 Oct 1924 The Universal Weekly announced that the "just completed" Pauline Frederick-Laura La Plante film would be called The Marrying Age.
       A restored copy of Smouldering Fires was screened at the UCLA Festival of Preservation in Westwood, CA, on 16 Feb 2019, and at the 2022 San Francisco Silent Film Festival on 11 May 2022. ...

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Some exteriors were shot in Yosemite National Park, according to the 1 Oct 1924 FD and other sources. At least one source credits Leo E. Kuter as art director, while other sources credit E. E. Sheeley. The 10 Jan 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that Melville Brown was hired as a "gag" man and co-author.
       The 18 Oct 1924 The Universal Weekly announced that the "just completed" Pauline Frederick-Laura La Plante film would be called The Marrying Age.
       A restored copy of Smouldering Fires was screened at the UCLA Festival of Preservation in Westwood, CA, on 16 Feb 2019, and at the 2022 San Francisco Silent Film Festival on 11 May 2022.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
20 Dec 1924
p. 52
Film Daily
1 Oct 1924
p. 6
Film Daily
7 Dec 1924
---
Life
4 Jun 1925
p. 35
Moving Picture World
13 Dec 1924
pp. 643-44
New York Times
31 Mar 1925
p. 17
Photoplay
Feb 1925
p. 57
Universal Weekly
18 Oct 1924
p. 10
Variety
1 Apr 1925
p. 38
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Marrying Age
Release Date:
18 January 1925
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Corp.
25 November 1924
LP20842
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83
Length(in feet):
7,356
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At 40, Jane Vale, a domineering and successful businesswoman, runs her family’s factory under the motto left behind by her father: “Let No Man Be Necessary to You.” However, she falls in love with Robert Elliott, a young man employed in the factory, whom she makes her private secretary. He soon asks her to marry him, both out of gratitude and to defend her reputation against the ugly gossip of his fellow workers. Before the wedding, Jane's younger sister, Dorothy, returns from college, and she and Robert fall in love, but they lack the courage to tell Jane. When Robert instead marries Jane, he tries to make her happy, but everything conspires to make her feel the difference in their ages: she is worn out and worried, unsuccessfully trying to look young and unable to mingle easily with Robert's young friends. When Jane finally realizes that Robert, though he is faithful and attentive to her, is really in love with Dorothy, she pretends that she no longer loves him and asks for a divorce. Robert and Dorothy, alike in age and inclination, are thus free to find the happiness that has eluded ...

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At 40, Jane Vale, a domineering and successful businesswoman, runs her family’s factory under the motto left behind by her father: “Let No Man Be Necessary to You.” However, she falls in love with Robert Elliott, a young man employed in the factory, whom she makes her private secretary. He soon asks her to marry him, both out of gratitude and to defend her reputation against the ugly gossip of his fellow workers. Before the wedding, Jane's younger sister, Dorothy, returns from college, and she and Robert fall in love, but they lack the courage to tell Jane. When Robert instead marries Jane, he tries to make her happy, but everything conspires to make her feel the difference in their ages: she is worn out and worried, unsuccessfully trying to look young and unable to mingle easily with Robert's young friends. When Jane finally realizes that Robert, though he is faithful and attentive to her, is really in love with Dorothy, she pretends that she no longer loves him and asks for a divorce. Robert and Dorothy, alike in age and inclination, are thus free to find the happiness that has eluded Jane.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.