Stolen Pleasures (1927)

Drama | 5 January 1927

Director:

Phil Rosen

Writer:

Leah Baird

Cinematographer:

J. O. Taylor

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The production was announced as one of twenty-four Columbia Pictures Corp. releases for the 1926-1927 season. The article attributed the original story, “Stolen Pleasures,” to writer Gertrude Atherton, although its publication could not be determined. The 23 May 1926 [Dayton, OH] News erroneously claimed that the film was based on another Atherton story, The Tragedy of a Snob, which concerned a fictional social climber named “Andrew Webb.” Later that year, the 16 October 1926 Motion Picture News attributed the story to Leah Baird and included Armand Kaliz among the cast. Principal photography had begun at Columbia Studios in Hollywood, CA, under the direction of Philip E. Rosen, who was also in the process of scouting exterior locations. The 30 October 1926 Moving Picture World credited Columbia vice-president and production chief Harry Cohn with selecting the cast.
       The close of production was reported in the 27 November 1926 issues of Motion Picture News and Exhibitors Herald. Edward M. Roskam was identified as editor. The film was released on 5 January 1927, followed by an opening during the week of 31 January 1927 at Moss’s Broadway Theatre in New York City.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.
...

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The production was announced as one of twenty-four Columbia Pictures Corp. releases for the 1926-1927 season. The article attributed the original story, “Stolen Pleasures,” to writer Gertrude Atherton, although its publication could not be determined. The 23 May 1926 [Dayton, OH] News erroneously claimed that the film was based on another Atherton story, The Tragedy of a Snob, which concerned a fictional social climber named “Andrew Webb.” Later that year, the 16 October 1926 Motion Picture News attributed the story to Leah Baird and included Armand Kaliz among the cast. Principal photography had begun at Columbia Studios in Hollywood, CA, under the direction of Philip E. Rosen, who was also in the process of scouting exterior locations. The 30 October 1926 Moving Picture World credited Columbia vice-president and production chief Harry Cohn with selecting the cast.
       The close of production was reported in the 27 November 1926 issues of Motion Picture News and Exhibitors Herald. Edward M. Roskam was identified as editor. The film was released on 5 January 1927, followed by an opening during the week of 31 January 1927 at Moss’s Broadway Theatre in New York City.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Dayton Daily News [Dayton, OH]
23 May 1926
p. 21
Exhibitors Herald
16 Oct 1926
p. 68
Exhibitors Herald
27 Nov 1926
p. 93
Film Daily
8 Mar 1926
p. 1
Film Daily
6 Feb 1927
---
Motion Picture News
16 Oct 1926
p. 1484
Motion Picture News
27 Nov 1926
p. 2040
Motion Picture News
7 Jan 1927
p. 51
Moving Picture World
30 Oct 1926
p. 551
Variety
2 Feb 1927
p. 19
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Philip E. Rosen
Dir
PRODUCER
Supv
WRITERS
Story
Cont
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 January 1927
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 31 Jan 1927
Production Date:
Oct--Nov 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
15 January 1927
LP23544
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,064
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Two married couples, the Mannings and the Bradleys, separate following heated quarrels. Herbert Bradly meets Doris Manning and offers to take her to the city, but a storm forces them to seek shelter in a roadhouse. Lounge lizard Guy Summers calls on Clara Bradley and induces her to attend a party with him, but he takes her to the same roadhouse. There, in a private room, Guy tries to seduce Clara, but she escapes when the roadhouse catches fire. Later, John Manning denounces Doris and accuses Herbert of cheating on his own wife. Clara then reveals that she was present that night and confirms the innocence of both Doris and ...

More Less

Two married couples, the Mannings and the Bradleys, separate following heated quarrels. Herbert Bradly meets Doris Manning and offers to take her to the city, but a storm forces them to seek shelter in a roadhouse. Lounge lizard Guy Summers calls on Clara Bradley and induces her to attend a party with him, but he takes her to the same roadhouse. There, in a private room, Guy tries to seduce Clara, but she escapes when the roadhouse catches fire. Later, John Manning denounces Doris and accuses Herbert of cheating on his own wife. Clara then reveals that she was present that night and confirms the innocence of both Doris and Herbert.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.