Tenderloin (1928)

85 mins | Melodrama | 28 April 1928

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HISTORY

The 16 Dec 1927 Motion Picture News announced that director Michael Curtiz had shot the first scenes of Tenderloin.
       On 21 Mar 1928, Var printed two different reviews of the film. One review was entitled "First Night" and reflected a screening to "hard-boiled first-night audiences," while the second review, written by another author, was entitled "Third Night" and reflected the critic's perception of the film before a "wholly lay audience." The first review stated that the picture was "the first actual talking picture, wherein the characters speak their film roles."
       Although newspaper ads for the film, both in New York and elsewhere, proclaimed it "the first feature-length voice film released" and added "see and hear" star Dolores Costello, the characterization of Tenderloin as the first "talking" feature is not completely accurate. There were some brief lines of spoken dialogue in Warner Bros' earlier film The Jazz Singer , and the first 100% talking feature, Lights of New York , had its New York premiere almost four-months later, on 6 Jul 1928 (see entries above).
       The two reviews reveal that, after the opening night, because of negative audience reaction, two of the four talking sequences were eliminated. Modern sources state that the dialogue sequences encompassed about fifteen minutes of screen time. As of 2010, no surviving prints of Tenderloin are known to ... More Less

The 16 Dec 1927 Motion Picture News announced that director Michael Curtiz had shot the first scenes of Tenderloin.
       On 21 Mar 1928, Var printed two different reviews of the film. One review was entitled "First Night" and reflected a screening to "hard-boiled first-night audiences," while the second review, written by another author, was entitled "Third Night" and reflected the critic's perception of the film before a "wholly lay audience." The first review stated that the picture was "the first actual talking picture, wherein the characters speak their film roles."
       Although newspaper ads for the film, both in New York and elsewhere, proclaimed it "the first feature-length voice film released" and added "see and hear" star Dolores Costello, the characterization of Tenderloin as the first "talking" feature is not completely accurate. There were some brief lines of spoken dialogue in Warner Bros' earlier film The Jazz Singer , and the first 100% talking feature, Lights of New York , had its New York premiere almost four-months later, on 6 Jul 1928 (see entries above).
       The two reviews reveal that, after the opening night, because of negative audience reaction, two of the four talking sequences were eliminated. Modern sources state that the dialogue sequences encompassed about fifteen minutes of screen time. As of 2010, no surviving prints of Tenderloin are known to exist. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
18 Mar 1928.
---
Motion Picture News
16 Dec 1927
o, 1906.
New York Times
15 Mar 1928
p. 28.
Variety
21 Mar 1928
p. 18.
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 April 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 March 1928
Production Date:
began December 1927
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 March 1928
Copyright Number:
LP25089
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Talking seq by Vitaphone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Duration(in mins):
85
Length(in feet):
7,340, 7,782
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The film's title refers to the district of a city so identified. Rose Shannon, a cabaret dancer, falls in love with Chuck, a hardened criminal. When some of Chuck's cronies pull a bank job, Chuck suspects Rose of having hidden the money for them. He pretends to care for her, but finally he realizes that she knows nothing at all about the robbery. By then, however, he has genuinely fallen in love with her, she has persuaded him to reform, and they have decided to get ... +


The film's title refers to the district of a city so identified. Rose Shannon, a cabaret dancer, falls in love with Chuck, a hardened criminal. When some of Chuck's cronies pull a bank job, Chuck suspects Rose of having hidden the money for them. He pretends to care for her, but finally he realizes that she knows nothing at all about the robbery. By then, however, he has genuinely fallen in love with her, she has persuaded him to reform, and they have decided to get married. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.