Full page view
HISTORY

Alternate spellings of this title included Three Week Ends and 3 Weekends. The film marked the third Elinor Glyn script to star Clara Bow after It (1927) and Red Hair (1928, see entries), as noted in the 2 September 1928 San Francisco Examiner. Bennie Zeidman (a.k.a. B. F. Zeidman) was set to supervise the production, and English actor William Austin was brought on to co-star, according to the 11 April 1928 and 30 May 1928 issues of ^Variety, respectively. Austin did not remain with the project.
       Principal photography began the week of 22 September 1928, as announced in the 29 September 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. Shooting took place at Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.’s studio at 5451 Marathon Street in Hollywood, CA. Although the 26 September 1928 Variety indicated that four sound sequences would be shot, with dances and sets designed by choreographers Fanchon & Marco, the film was released as a silent without sound sequences. Shooting was completed sometime in October 1928.
       Items in the July and September 1928 issues of Exhibitors Daily Review, Variety, and Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World listed the following as cast members: Chester Conklin; Robert Castle; Alona Marlowe; and Dick Winslow. Lucille Powers was said to have been selected from a group of extras when cast in the role of “Miss Witherspoon,” as stated in the 3 October 1928 Variety.
       On 27 October 1928, the Los Angeles Evening Post-Record reported that George Marion, Jr. had been hired to title the film. However, ...

More Less

Alternate spellings of this title included Three Week Ends and 3 Weekends. The film marked the third Elinor Glyn script to star Clara Bow after It (1927) and Red Hair (1928, see entries), as noted in the 2 September 1928 San Francisco Examiner. Bennie Zeidman (a.k.a. B. F. Zeidman) was set to supervise the production, and English actor William Austin was brought on to co-star, according to the 11 April 1928 and 30 May 1928 issues of ^Variety, respectively. Austin did not remain with the project.
       Principal photography began the week of 22 September 1928, as announced in the 29 September 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. Shooting took place at Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.’s studio at 5451 Marathon Street in Hollywood, CA. Although the 26 September 1928 Variety indicated that four sound sequences would be shot, with dances and sets designed by choreographers Fanchon & Marco, the film was released as a silent without sound sequences. Shooting was completed sometime in October 1928.
       Items in the July and September 1928 issues of Exhibitors Daily Review, Variety, and Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World listed the following as cast members: Chester Conklin; Robert Castle; Alona Marlowe; and Dick Winslow. Lucille Powers was said to have been selected from a group of extras when cast in the role of “Miss Witherspoon,” as stated in the 3 October 1928 Variety.
       On 27 October 1928, the Los Angeles Evening Post-Record reported that George Marion, Jr. had been hired to title the film. However, the 3 November 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review announced that Paul Perez would serve as titles writer, and Herman Mankiewicz was named in the same role in the 15 November 1928 issue.
       Prior to the film’s theatrical release on 8 December 1928, an early screening for U.S. President-elect Herbert Hoover occurred in mid-November 1928 aboard the U.S.S. Maryland, according to a 20 November 1928 [Santa Ana, CA] Santa Ana Register brief.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of October 2019.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
New York Times
10 Dec 1928
p. 25
Variety
12 Dec 1928
p. 28
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
3 Weekends
Three Week Ends
Release Date:
8 December 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 8 Dec 1928
Production Date:
late Sep--Oct 1928
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.
7 December 1928
LP25909
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in feet):
5,962
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Chorus girl Gladys O'Brien falls hard for apparently wealthy James Gordon, an insurance salesman who is trying hard to sell a policy to Turner, a Broadway playboy. Turner invites Gladys to a weekend party at his country house, and she accepts, hoping to persuade Turner to sign James's policy. James crashes the affair and punches Turner in the nose. He and Gladys start back to the city together, and James tells her that, in reality, he is as poor as a churchmouse. To add to his financial woes, James loses his job for hitting Turner. Gladys uses her charms to have him rehired and then genteelly blackmails Turner into signing the insurance policy written up by James. James sees them together and suspects the worst. He and Gladys are soon reconciled, however, and make plans to be ...

More Less

Chorus girl Gladys O'Brien falls hard for apparently wealthy James Gordon, an insurance salesman who is trying hard to sell a policy to Turner, a Broadway playboy. Turner invites Gladys to a weekend party at his country house, and she accepts, hoping to persuade Turner to sign James's policy. James crashes the affair and punches Turner in the nose. He and Gladys start back to the city together, and James tells her that, in reality, he is as poor as a churchmouse. To add to his financial woes, James loses his job for hitting Turner. Gladys uses her charms to have him rehired and then genteelly blackmails Turner into signing the insurance policy written up by James. James sees them together and suspects the worst. He and Gladys are soon reconciled, however, and make plans to be married.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Great Dictator

The working title of this picture was The Dictator . In the cast credits at the end of the film, Charles Chaplin is listed in both the "People ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

All Quiet on the Western Front

The opening title card reads: "Carl Laemmle presents All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque ." After the opening credits, the following written prologue ... >>

All About Eve

The working title of this film was Best Performance. In the onscreen credits, the character of the director is called "Bill Simpson," but he is referred to ... >>

The Thing

The complete title of the viewed print was The Thing from Another World . In the opening credits, the words "The Thing" appear first in exaggerated, flaming ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.