Turn to the Right (1922)

Comedy-drama | 27 February 1922

Director:

Rex Ingram

Cinematographer:

John F. Seitz

Production Company:

Metro Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

According to the 20 Jan 1921 FD, the picture would be among the first produced by the Independent Film Co., which recently merged with the Standard Film Co., and was based in St. Louis, MO. However, on 8 Feb 1921, FD announced that Metro Pictures Corp. had purchased screen rights to the stage play, Turn to the Right, for the record-hight price of $250,000, following two years of negotiations with playwrights Winchell Smith and Jack E. Hazzard. Locations were to take place on the West and East coasts, including Winchell Smith’s estate in Farmington, CT, where the “well known peach orchard scenes” would be shot.
       Over four months later, the 23 Jun 1921 FD reported that Rex Ingram had been hired to direct the picture. The 6 Aug 1921 Moving Picture World announced that Ingram had arrived on the West Coast to begin filming at Metro Studios in Hollywood, CA, and noted the casting of Alice Terry in the lead female role. Ingram decided to shoot the film entirely in CA, where a peach orchard could easily be replicated.
       According to a studio chart in the 30 Jul 1921 Camera, the film was in its first week of production. The 20 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News stated that principal photography had begun. Two months later, the 29 Oct 1921 Moving Picture World reported that filming had completed earlier in the month, and Rex Ingram was currently editing and titling the picture. Racetrack scenes were filmed at Santa Rosa in Sonoma County, Northern CA, according to the 10 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News. ... More Less

According to the 20 Jan 1921 FD, the picture would be among the first produced by the Independent Film Co., which recently merged with the Standard Film Co., and was based in St. Louis, MO. However, on 8 Feb 1921, FD announced that Metro Pictures Corp. had purchased screen rights to the stage play, Turn to the Right, for the record-hight price of $250,000, following two years of negotiations with playwrights Winchell Smith and Jack E. Hazzard. Locations were to take place on the West and East coasts, including Winchell Smith’s estate in Farmington, CT, where the “well known peach orchard scenes” would be shot.
       Over four months later, the 23 Jun 1921 FD reported that Rex Ingram had been hired to direct the picture. The 6 Aug 1921 Moving Picture World announced that Ingram had arrived on the West Coast to begin filming at Metro Studios in Hollywood, CA, and noted the casting of Alice Terry in the lead female role. Ingram decided to shoot the film entirely in CA, where a peach orchard could easily be replicated.
       According to a studio chart in the 30 Jul 1921 Camera, the film was in its first week of production. The 20 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News stated that principal photography had begun. Two months later, the 29 Oct 1921 Moving Picture World reported that filming had completed earlier in the month, and Rex Ingram was currently editing and titling the picture. Racetrack scenes were filmed at Santa Rosa in Sonoma County, Northern CA, according to the 10 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News.
       The 18 Jan 1922 FD announced a limited engagement at the Lyric Theatre in New York City on 23 Jan 1922, with a general release set for Feb 1922. Metro had originally planned to release the picture in the fall, according to the 27 Jan 1922 FD.
       Reviews were overwhelmingly positive. Highlights from multiple sources, reprinted in the 25 Jan 1922 FD, lauded Turn to the Right as a “delightful picture” where beauty abounds. Critcs praised Ingram’s versatility to create a “an extremely good light comedy-drama.” The Jun 1922 issue of Educational Screen listed Turn to the Right as one of the year’s “Fifteen Best Productions (so far),” and called the film “a flawless production” that "surpassed the play on the stage."
       The film print for Turn to the Right was fully restored by The Film Foundation, an organization founded in 1990 by director Martin Scorsese. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
30 Jul 1921
p. 11.
Film Daily
20 Jan 1921
p. 6.
Film Daily
8 Feb 1921
p. 1, 3.
Film Daily
23 Jun 1921
p. 1.
Film Daily
18 Jan 1922
p. 1.
Film Daily
25 Jan 1922
p. 4.
Film Daily
27 Jan 1922
p. 2.
Motion Picture News
20 Aug 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
6 Aug 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
29 Oct 1921.
---
The Educational Screen
Jun 1922.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Turn to the Right, a Comedy in a Prologue and Three Acts by Winchell Smith, Jack E. Hazzard (New York, 1916).
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 February 1922
Premiere Information:
Milwaukee premiere: ca12 February 1922
Production Date:
late July--October 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Metro Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
27 February 1922
Copyright Number:
LP17686
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,703
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Joe Bascom, only son of a widow, lives in a Connecticut village. He loves Elsie Tillinger, daughter of the deacon, the wealthiest man in town; but the deacon forbids Joe to speak to her. Joe leaves home to make his way in the world, but his employer, Mr. Morgan, a wealthy racehorse owner, accuses him unjustly of stealing. Actually, Morgan's son, Lester, is guilty of the crime, but Joe is sentenced to a prison term; there he becomes acquainted with Mugsy and Gilly, two crooks. Meanwhile, though courted by young Morgan, Elsie remains faithful to Joe. Mrs. Bascom, who makes superlative peach jam from her orchard, is in debt to the Deacon Tillinger, and he intends to buy her orchard and make Lester head of a jam industry. But Joe arrives with his crook friends, outwits the deacon, and takes over the peach orchard. Mugsy and Gilly are reformed by the goodness of Joe's mother and fall in love with Betty and Jessie; and after exposing Lester Morgan's deceit, Joe marries ... +


Joe Bascom, only son of a widow, lives in a Connecticut village. He loves Elsie Tillinger, daughter of the deacon, the wealthiest man in town; but the deacon forbids Joe to speak to her. Joe leaves home to make his way in the world, but his employer, Mr. Morgan, a wealthy racehorse owner, accuses him unjustly of stealing. Actually, Morgan's son, Lester, is guilty of the crime, but Joe is sentenced to a prison term; there he becomes acquainted with Mugsy and Gilly, two crooks. Meanwhile, though courted by young Morgan, Elsie remains faithful to Joe. Mrs. Bascom, who makes superlative peach jam from her orchard, is in debt to the Deacon Tillinger, and he intends to buy her orchard and make Lester head of a jam industry. But Joe arrives with his crook friends, outwits the deacon, and takes over the peach orchard. Mugsy and Gilly are reformed by the goodness of Joe's mother and fall in love with Betty and Jessie; and after exposing Lester Morgan's deceit, Joe marries Elsie. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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