Under a Texas Moon (1930)

Western | 1 April 1930

Director:

Michael Curtiz

Writer:

Gordon Rigby

Cinematographer:

William Rees

Editor:

Ralph Dawson

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
6 Apr 1930
---
New York Times
4 Apr 1930
p. 22
Variety
9 Apr 1930
p. 22
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Two-Gun Man" by Edward Stewart White in Famous Story Magazine (Oct 1925).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Under a Texas Moon," words and music by Ray Perkins.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 April 1930
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
19 March 1930
LP1161
Physical Properties:
Sound
Vitaphone
Color
Technicolor
Length(in feet):
7,498
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Don Carlos, a dashing Mexican adventurer, and his guitar-strumming friends, Pedro and Philipe, ride into the Lazy Y Ranch on the Texas border and become enamored of the beautiful sisters Dolores and Raquella. Gus Aldrich offers a reward for the capture of rustlers who have been stealing his cattle, and the trio embark on their mission; but Don Carlos dallies over a pretty girl at an inn and runs into trouble with her bullfighting brother, Antonio. At the hacienda of Don Roberto, he encounters Lolita, who tries to persuade him to kill Gonzales, her fiancé, whom she is being forced to marry; but he escapes and, locating the stolen cattle, drives them back to the ranch. The Bad Man, Antonio, and Gonzales arrive bent on vengeance; Don Carlos accepts the reward and drives the adversaries into a food cooler; after evading the clutches of the quarreling señoritas, Don Carlos kidnaps the innkeeper's daughter and rides into ...

More Less

Don Carlos, a dashing Mexican adventurer, and his guitar-strumming friends, Pedro and Philipe, ride into the Lazy Y Ranch on the Texas border and become enamored of the beautiful sisters Dolores and Raquella. Gus Aldrich offers a reward for the capture of rustlers who have been stealing his cattle, and the trio embark on their mission; but Don Carlos dallies over a pretty girl at an inn and runs into trouble with her bullfighting brother, Antonio. At the hacienda of Don Roberto, he encounters Lolita, who tries to persuade him to kill Gonzales, her fiancé, whom she is being forced to marry; but he escapes and, locating the stolen cattle, drives them back to the ranch. The Bad Man, Antonio, and Gonzales arrive bent on vengeance; Don Carlos accepts the reward and drives the adversaries into a food cooler; after evading the clutches of the quarreling señoritas, Don Carlos kidnaps the innkeeper's daughter and rides into Mexico.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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