The Village Blacksmith (1923)

Melodrama | 1 January 1923

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HISTORY

The 29 May 1922 FD reported that the film company, under the direction of Jack Ford, had gone to Tijuana, Mexico, for location shots. The title at that time was Kentucky Days, before being changed to The Village Blacksmith. A year later, Fox Film Corp. renamed another film Kentucky Days, starring Dustin Farnum (1923, see entry).
       The Village Blacksmith was billed as a "big special" and "all-star feature" in trade magazines, and many "stage celebrities" were added to the cast of Hollywood stars, according to the 24 Jun 1922 Motion Picture News.
       The 24 Jun 1922 Exhibitors Herald announced that the film was in the cutting room. ...

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The 29 May 1922 FD reported that the film company, under the direction of Jack Ford, had gone to Tijuana, Mexico, for location shots. The title at that time was Kentucky Days, before being changed to The Village Blacksmith. A year later, Fox Film Corp. renamed another film Kentucky Days, starring Dustin Farnum (1923, see entry).
       The Village Blacksmith was billed as a "big special" and "all-star feature" in trade magazines, and many "stage celebrities" were added to the cast of Hollywood stars, according to the 24 Jun 1922 Motion Picture News.
       The 24 Jun 1922 Exhibitors Herald announced that the film was in the cutting room.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
24 Jun 1922
p. 70
Film Daily
29 May 1922
p. 2
Motion Picture News
24 Jun 1922
p. 3334
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Jack Ford
Dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Inspired by the poem "The Village Blacksmith" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1842).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Kentucky Days
Release Date:
1 January 1923
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 2 Nov 1922
Production Date:
May - Jun 1922
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Fox Film Corp.
31 December 1922
LP19092
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,540
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In a prologue, Johnnie Hammond, one of the village blacksmith's two sons, is crippled by a fall from a tree that Anson Brigham, the squire's son, had dared him to climb. The squire is an enemy of the blacksmith, who married the woman the squire loved. Many years later, Bill Hammond, the other son, has become a doctor, and Alice Hammond, his sister, is having an affair with the squire's son, who has just returned from college. Bill is injured in a train accident, and Alice, accused of stealing money belonging to the church, tries to commit suicide. The blacksmith rescues Alice; the elder brother recovers in time to successfully operates on Johnnie's legs, and the film ends ...

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In a prologue, Johnnie Hammond, one of the village blacksmith's two sons, is crippled by a fall from a tree that Anson Brigham, the squire's son, had dared him to climb. The squire is an enemy of the blacksmith, who married the woman the squire loved. Many years later, Bill Hammond, the other son, has become a doctor, and Alice Hammond, his sister, is having an affair with the squire's son, who has just returned from college. Bill is injured in a train accident, and Alice, accused of stealing money belonging to the church, tries to commit suicide. The blacksmith rescues Alice; the elder brother recovers in time to successfully operates on Johnnie's legs, and the film ends happily.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Rural


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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