The Wall Flower (1922)

Romance | May 1922

Director:

Rupert Hughes

Writer:

Rupert Hughes

Cinematographer:

John Mescall

Production Company:

Goldwyn Pictures
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HISTORY

The 9 Feb 1921 FD announced the picture as one of Samuel Goldwyn’s nineteen new productions. Six months later, the 20 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News reported that filming would begin that week on the original story by Rupert Hughes, under the direction of E. Mason Hopper, and named Colleen Moore in the lead role. On 27 Aug 1921, Motion Picture News confirmed that principal photography was underway, with Hughes acting as an advisor to Hopper. The 17 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News noted that production would be completed that week. Three weeks later, the 8 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News announced that “finishing touches” were being completed in the laboratory.
       According to an advertisement in the 10 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News and a news item in the 24 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News, Rupert Hughes, rather than E. Mason Hopper, had directed his own story.
       Reviews were mixed, with the picture deemed both “far-fetched” and “uninteresting.” Colleen Moore’s performance was singled out as one of the few convincing elements. On 27 Jun 1922, the FD summary of film reviews praised The Wall Flower as being “delightfully piquant.” However, the final two film reels were “said to have been introduced after the picture had been recalled to the studio,” and were criticized as looking as if they had been an “afterthought.”
       The film is copyrighted under the title, The Wallflower. ... More Less

The 9 Feb 1921 FD announced the picture as one of Samuel Goldwyn’s nineteen new productions. Six months later, the 20 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News reported that filming would begin that week on the original story by Rupert Hughes, under the direction of E. Mason Hopper, and named Colleen Moore in the lead role. On 27 Aug 1921, Motion Picture News confirmed that principal photography was underway, with Hughes acting as an advisor to Hopper. The 17 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News noted that production would be completed that week. Three weeks later, the 8 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News announced that “finishing touches” were being completed in the laboratory.
       According to an advertisement in the 10 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News and a news item in the 24 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News, Rupert Hughes, rather than E. Mason Hopper, had directed his own story.
       Reviews were mixed, with the picture deemed both “far-fetched” and “uninteresting.” Colleen Moore’s performance was singled out as one of the few convincing elements. On 27 Jun 1922, the FD summary of film reviews praised The Wall Flower as being “delightfully piquant.” However, the final two film reels were “said to have been introduced after the picture had been recalled to the studio,” and were criticized as looking as if they had been an “afterthought.”
       The film is copyrighted under the title, The Wallflower. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
9 Feb 1921
p. 1, 4.
Film Daily
27 Jun 1922
p. 2.
Motion Picture News
20 Aug 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
27 Aug 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
17 Sep 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
8 Oct 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
10 Dec 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
24 Dec 1921.
---
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Wallflower
Release Date:
May 1922
Production Date:
late August--September 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Goldwyn Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
29 June 1922
Copyright Number:
LP18020
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,228
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Idalene Nobbin, who is accustomed to being treated as a hopeless wallflower by her mother and her brothers, attends a dance given by Prue Nickerson and is greatly surprised when Roy Duncan, a football star, asks her to dance. Later, however, she is the victim of an unkind jest, which so mortifies her that she throws herself in front of a speeding auto; with both legs broken, she is picked up by wealthy society girl Pamela Shiel and her guest Walter Breen and taken to Pamela's home. Idalene tells Pamela she wished to die because no man would ever want to marry her. Pamela surrounds Idalene with luxuries and teaches her to walk gracefully and wear stylish clothes; and soon her blooming charm attracts Breen. At a party Pamela gives in her honor her former critics pay her homage. Idalene refuses Breen's proposal of marriage when she learns that Pamela also loves him; but Pamela suppresses her feelings in favor of Idalene, and the lovers are happily ... +


Idalene Nobbin, who is accustomed to being treated as a hopeless wallflower by her mother and her brothers, attends a dance given by Prue Nickerson and is greatly surprised when Roy Duncan, a football star, asks her to dance. Later, however, she is the victim of an unkind jest, which so mortifies her that she throws herself in front of a speeding auto; with both legs broken, she is picked up by wealthy society girl Pamela Shiel and her guest Walter Breen and taken to Pamela's home. Idalene tells Pamela she wished to die because no man would ever want to marry her. Pamela surrounds Idalene with luxuries and teaches her to walk gracefully and wear stylish clothes; and soon her blooming charm attracts Breen. At a party Pamela gives in her honor her former critics pay her homage. Idalene refuses Breen's proposal of marriage when she learns that Pamela also loves him; but Pamela suppresses her feelings in favor of Idalene, and the lovers are happily united. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.