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HISTORY

A 1926 Warner Bros. film entitled Private Izzy Murphy also starred George Jessel. While that film, which was directed by Lloyd Bacon and co-starred Patsy Ruth Miller (see entry), is not directly related to Sailor Izzy Murphy, reviewers noted that the title and comic situations capitalized on the earlier film's success. ...

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A 1926 Warner Bros. film entitled Private Izzy Murphy also starred George Jessel. While that film, which was directed by Lloyd Bacon and co-starred Patsy Ruth Miller (see entry), is not directly related to Sailor Izzy Murphy, reviewers noted that the title and comic situations capitalized on the earlier film's success.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
12 Oct 1927
p. 33
Film Daily
30 Oct 1927
---
Variety
23 Nov 1927
p. 25
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 October 1927
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
28 September 1927
LP24456
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,020
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Izzy, a perfume vendor, is urged by Jake, his partner, to sell Monsieur Jules, a millionaire perfume merchant, their special formula, but the merchant is incensed to see his daughter's picture on Izzy's perfume bottles and gives him the bum's rush. Aboard Jules's palatial yacht, he receives from Orchid Joe notes threatening his life. Joe is a lunatic who hates people who destroy flowers, and he plans to kill Jules with the help of a crew of maniacs on the yacht. Izzy gets aboard by announcing himself as "Muscle-Bound Murphy," along with Jake, and they promise to help the millionaire and his daughter, Marie. When Izzy is assigned to kill Jules, he feigns great joy and induces Jake to stand in for the assassination, but they are captured by the crew. Through his cleverness, Izzy outsmarts the maniacs and attracts a rescue party, thus closing the sale and winning the love of ...

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Izzy, a perfume vendor, is urged by Jake, his partner, to sell Monsieur Jules, a millionaire perfume merchant, their special formula, but the merchant is incensed to see his daughter's picture on Izzy's perfume bottles and gives him the bum's rush. Aboard Jules's palatial yacht, he receives from Orchid Joe notes threatening his life. Joe is a lunatic who hates people who destroy flowers, and he plans to kill Jules with the help of a crew of maniacs on the yacht. Izzy gets aboard by announcing himself as "Muscle-Bound Murphy," along with Jake, and they promise to help the millionaire and his daughter, Marie. When Izzy is assigned to kill Jules, he feigns great joy and induces Jake to stand in for the assassination, but they are captured by the crew. Through his cleverness, Izzy outsmarts the maniacs and attracts a rescue party, thus closing the sale and winning the love of Marie.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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