Where the Pavement Ends (1923)

Melodrama | 19 March 1923

Director:

Rex Ingram

Writer:

Rex Ingram

Cinematographer:

John F. Seitz

Editor:

Rex Ingram

Production Company:

Metro Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

News items in the 4 Aug 1922 FD and 19 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that director Rex Ingram was in New York City to confer with writer John Russell about making a screen adaptation of Russell’s short story, “The Passion Vine.” An article in the 13 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review clarified that “The Passion Vine” had been published in Russell’s 1921 story collection, Where the Pavement Ends, which was essentially a reissue of stories previously published in the 1919 collection, The Red Mark. Ingram chose The Passion Vine as the working title of his film.
       Plans were initially made to shoot the South Seas romance in the West Indies, including the island of Jamaica. Interiors would be filmed at Miami Studios in Miami, FL, according to a 26 Aug 1922 FD brief. A 30 Sep 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review article confirmed that principal photography on The Passion Vine was scheduled to begin the first week of Oct 1922 in Miami, FL. The trade journal emphasized the satisfactory “technical facilities,” and indicated that various sets depicting outdoor scenes had been built at the studio, suggesting that plans to shoot at offshore locations may have changed. However, a news brief in the 27 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review stated that filming took place on the island of Cuba. Production lasted three full months, and by the time the company returned to New York City in Jan 1923, the title of the film had changed to Where the Pavement Ends.
       An article in the 10 Feb 1923 ... More Less

News items in the 4 Aug 1922 FD and 19 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that director Rex Ingram was in New York City to confer with writer John Russell about making a screen adaptation of Russell’s short story, “The Passion Vine.” An article in the 13 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review clarified that “The Passion Vine” had been published in Russell’s 1921 story collection, Where the Pavement Ends, which was essentially a reissue of stories previously published in the 1919 collection, The Red Mark. Ingram chose The Passion Vine as the working title of his film.
       Plans were initially made to shoot the South Seas romance in the West Indies, including the island of Jamaica. Interiors would be filmed at Miami Studios in Miami, FL, according to a 26 Aug 1922 FD brief. A 30 Sep 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review article confirmed that principal photography on The Passion Vine was scheduled to begin the first week of Oct 1922 in Miami, FL. The trade journal emphasized the satisfactory “technical facilities,” and indicated that various sets depicting outdoor scenes had been built at the studio, suggesting that plans to shoot at offshore locations may have changed. However, a news brief in the 27 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review stated that filming took place on the island of Cuba. Production lasted three full months, and by the time the company returned to New York City in Jan 1923, the title of the film had changed to Where the Pavement Ends.
       An article in the 10 Feb 1923 Motion Picture News indicated that post-production took place in New York City, with Tom Storey serving as the film “laboratory expert,” and Ingram serving as editor. A review in the Jun 1923 Educational Screen noted that Ingram created two endings for the film, a “trite one” in which the lovers return happily to “civilization,” and a “logical one” in which the lovers part ways. Exhibitors could choose to screen either version of the movie. The Educational Screen reviewer urged viewers to opt for the “minor key” ending. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Educational Screen
Jun 1923.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
19 Aug 1922.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
30 Sep 1922.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
13 Jan 1923.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
27 Jan 1923.
---
Film Daily
4 Aug 1922
p. 1.
Film Daily
26 Aug 1922.
---
Motion Picture News
10 Feb 1923.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Tech dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Passion Vine" by John Russell in The Red Mark (New York, 1919) and Where the Pavement Ends (London, 1921).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Passion Vine
Release Date:
19 March 1923
Production Date:
October 1922--late December 1922 or early January 1923
Copyright Claimant:
Metro Pictures
Copyright Date:
27 March 1923
Copyright Number:
LP18829
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,706
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Pastor Spener, dedicated to the conversion of the natives of Wallis Islands, is in constant contention with Hull Gregson, an unscrupulous trader who operates a saloon--to the detriment of the people. Because Gregson wishes to marry Matilda, the pastor's daughter, he makes Spener believe that he has reformed. Matilda, however, loves Motauri, a young native chief, and runs away with him despite the enormous obstacles to their union. In a violent storm they are forced to take refuge in Gregson's shack. Motauri overpowers Gregson, takes Matilda to his hut, leaves her after she faints, and jumps over a waterfall. (In the copyright synopsis Motauri turns out to be a white man and happily returns to New England with ... +


Pastor Spener, dedicated to the conversion of the natives of Wallis Islands, is in constant contention with Hull Gregson, an unscrupulous trader who operates a saloon--to the detriment of the people. Because Gregson wishes to marry Matilda, the pastor's daughter, he makes Spener believe that he has reformed. Matilda, however, loves Motauri, a young native chief, and runs away with him despite the enormous obstacles to their union. In a violent storm they are forced to take refuge in Gregson's shack. Motauri overpowers Gregson, takes Matilda to his hut, leaves her after she faints, and jumps over a waterfall. (In the copyright synopsis Motauri turns out to be a white man and happily returns to New England with Matilda.) +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.