Abie's Irish Rose (1929)

129 or 80 mins | Drama | 5 January 1929

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HISTORY

According to a production chart in the 7 Jan 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. work began on Abie's Irish Rose in early Nov 1927.
       Abie's Irish Rose opened in New York City in mid-Apr 1928 as a silent film. According to the 25 Apr 1928 Var review, the picture ran 129 min. The reviewer predicted poor box office prospects for the film, despite the great success of Anne Nichol's original Broadway play on which the film was based.
       The picture was cut to approximately 80 min., as stated in a second Var review on 26 Dec 1928. The review, reported that the shortened version, which opened at the Rialto Theatre in New York on 22 Dec 1928, contained three dialogue sequences. The second review predicted a wider audience for the new version
       Nichols' play also was the basis for the 1946 Bing Crosby Production Abie's Irish Rose . That version, which updated the story to World War II, was directed by A. Edward Sutherland and starred Richard Norris and Joanne Dru (See ... More Less

According to a production chart in the 7 Jan 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. work began on Abie's Irish Rose in early Nov 1927.
       Abie's Irish Rose opened in New York City in mid-Apr 1928 as a silent film. According to the 25 Apr 1928 Var review, the picture ran 129 min. The reviewer predicted poor box office prospects for the film, despite the great success of Anne Nichol's original Broadway play on which the film was based.
       The picture was cut to approximately 80 min., as stated in a second Var review on 26 Dec 1928. The review, reported that the shortened version, which opened at the Rialto Theatre in New York on 22 Dec 1928, contained three dialogue sequences. The second review predicted a wider audience for the new version
       Nichols' play also was the basis for the 1946 Bing Crosby Production Abie's Irish Rose . That version, which updated the story to World War II, was directed by A. Edward Sutherland and starred Richard Norris and Joanne Dru (See Entry). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
7 Jan 1928
p. 43.
Film Daily
22 Apr 1928
p. 8.
Film Spectator
31 Mar 1928
pp. 18-19.
New York Times
20 Apr 28
p. 26.
Variety
26 Dec 28
p. 27.
Variety
25 Apr 1928
p. 29.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Abie's Irish Rose by Anne Nichols (New York, 23 May 1922).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Rosemary" and "Little Irish Rose," music by J. S. Zamecnik, lyrics by Anne Nichols.
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 January 1929
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 19 April 1928
Production Date:
began early November 1927
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 January 1929
Copyright Number:
LP25986
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Talking seq, sound effects, & music score by Movietone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Length also listed at 10,187 ft.
Duration(in mins):
129 or 80
Length(in feet):
10,471
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

During World War I, Abie Levy, a soldier in the A. E. F., is wounded in combat. While recovering in a hospital, he meets Rosemary Murphy, an entertainer. They fall in love, return to the United States, and get married in an Episcopal church in Jersey City. Abie takes Rosemary to his home and introduces her as his sweetheart, Rosie Murpheski; they are then married by a rabbi. Mr. Murphy arrives with a priest and, amid discord and discontent, the young people are married again, this time by the priest. Disowned by both families, Rosemary and Abie are befriended only by the Cohens. On Christmas Eve, the Cohens and their rabbi persuade Solomon to see his son and his new grandchildren; the priest urges Mr. Murphy to do the same. This surprise visit begins in acrimony, but ends peacefully as Rosemary presents her newborn twins: Patrick Joseph, named for her father, and Rebecca, named for Abie's dead ... +


During World War I, Abie Levy, a soldier in the A. E. F., is wounded in combat. While recovering in a hospital, he meets Rosemary Murphy, an entertainer. They fall in love, return to the United States, and get married in an Episcopal church in Jersey City. Abie takes Rosemary to his home and introduces her as his sweetheart, Rosie Murpheski; they are then married by a rabbi. Mr. Murphy arrives with a priest and, amid discord and discontent, the young people are married again, this time by the priest. Disowned by both families, Rosemary and Abie are befriended only by the Cohens. On Christmas Eve, the Cohens and their rabbi persuade Solomon to see his son and his new grandchildren; the priest urges Mr. Murphy to do the same. This surprise visit begins in acrimony, but ends peacefully as Rosemary presents her newborn twins: Patrick Joseph, named for her father, and Rebecca, named for Abie's dead mother. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.