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HISTORY

The film was based on the 1924 novel, The Eleventh Virgin by Dorothy Day. The acquisition of screen rights by Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., was reported in the 26 April 1924 Motion Picture News.
       On 19 November 1924, Variety stated that the scenario had been assigned to Hope Loring and Louis D. Lighton, who completed the script during a six-week working vacation in Honolulu, HI. During their stay, the writers were also to judge the “National Motion Picture contest” sponsored by Warner Bros. First prize was a contract with the studio.
       The start of principal photography at the Warner Hollywood studio was reported in the 31 January 1925 Moving Picture World. It was also noted that The Easiest Road was being considered for the release title before the company reverted to The Eleventh Virgin, claiming it was “a perfect motion picture title, with a big box office pull, and advertising angle.” Two weeks later, the 14 February 1925 issue announced the official title as The Woman Hater. William “Buster” Collier, Jr., was listed as a cast member.
       The 19 September 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review claimed that the film was released on 30 April 1925, while other sources stated that it was released on 6 August 1925. A New York City opening at the Piccadilly Theatre took place on 12 July 1925.
       Three unrelated short subject of the same name were released in 1909 by the Lubin Mfg. Co., and in 1910 by Thanhouser Film Corp., and The Powers Co. (see entries).
       According to the ...

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The film was based on the 1924 novel, The Eleventh Virgin by Dorothy Day. The acquisition of screen rights by Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., was reported in the 26 April 1924 Motion Picture News.
       On 19 November 1924, Variety stated that the scenario had been assigned to Hope Loring and Louis D. Lighton, who completed the script during a six-week working vacation in Honolulu, HI. During their stay, the writers were also to judge the “National Motion Picture contest” sponsored by Warner Bros. First prize was a contract with the studio.
       The start of principal photography at the Warner Hollywood studio was reported in the 31 January 1925 Moving Picture World. It was also noted that The Easiest Road was being considered for the release title before the company reverted to The Eleventh Virgin, claiming it was “a perfect motion picture title, with a big box office pull, and advertising angle.” Two weeks later, the 14 February 1925 issue announced the official title as The Woman Hater. William “Buster” Collier, Jr., was listed as a cast member.
       The 19 September 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review claimed that the film was released on 30 April 1925, while other sources stated that it was released on 6 August 1925. A New York City opening at the Piccadilly Theatre took place on 12 July 1925.
       Three unrelated short subject of the same name were released in 1909 by the Lubin Mfg. Co., and in 1910 by Thanhouser Film Corp., and The Powers Co. (see entries).
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
18 Jul 1925
p. 59
Exhibitors Herald
10 Oct 1925
p. 59
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Aug 1925
p. 61
Exhibitors Trade Review
19 Sep 1925
p. 50
Motion Picture News
26 Apr 1924
p. 1888
Motion Picture News
22 Aug 1925
p. 957
Moving Picture World
31 Jan 1925
p. 495
Moving Picture World
14 Feb 1925
p. 719
Moving Picture World
9 May 1925
p. 228
New York Times
13 Jul 1925
p. 20
Variety
19 Nov 1924
p. 27
Variety
15 Jul 1925
p. 34
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel, The Eleventh Virgin by Dorothy Day (New York, 1924).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Easiest Road
The Eleventh Virgin
Release Date:
6 August 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 Jul 1925
Production Date:
began Jan 1925
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
12 May 1925
LP21456
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,591
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Artist Miles Faversham leaves his lover, Marie, believing she has been unfaithful to him. Years later, Marie becomes a famous actress and wins wealthy young Philip Tranter as her suitor. Philip’s mother disapproves of Marie and asks Miles, a reputed “woman hater,” to disillusion the lad. Miles, who still loves Marie despite his distrust, sets out to court her in the sight of Philip. After Marie breaks several engagements with Philip, he becomes furiously jealous and enters Miles’s apartment with a gun. He finds Marie and Miles in each other's arms and threatens to shoot the artist. Hoping to protect Miles, Marie claims that she was only toying with his affections. Miles leaves in dejection and prepares to sail for Europe. However, Philip realizes the depth of Marie's love for Miles and relinquishes her to the artist. Marie hurries to the pier, arriving in time to sail with Miles on a European ...

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Artist Miles Faversham leaves his lover, Marie, believing she has been unfaithful to him. Years later, Marie becomes a famous actress and wins wealthy young Philip Tranter as her suitor. Philip’s mother disapproves of Marie and asks Miles, a reputed “woman hater,” to disillusion the lad. Miles, who still loves Marie despite his distrust, sets out to court her in the sight of Philip. After Marie breaks several engagements with Philip, he becomes furiously jealous and enters Miles’s apartment with a gun. He finds Marie and Miles in each other's arms and threatens to shoot the artist. Hoping to protect Miles, Marie claims that she was only toying with his affections. Miles leaves in dejection and prepares to sail for Europe. However, Philip realizes the depth of Marie's love for Miles and relinquishes her to the artist. Marie hurries to the pier, arriving in time to sail with Miles on a European honeymoon.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.