The Cavalier (1928)

69 mins | Adventure, Western | 1 November 1928

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HISTORY

The name of scenarist Victor Irvin is a pseudonym for director Irvin Willat.
       An advertisement in the 25 Apr 1928 Film Daily noted that The Cavalier was “in the course of production.” The film was set to music and synchronized sound effects, both by Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld, via the RCA Photophone process. A 19 Sep 1928 Var article stated that Tiffany-Stahl Productions had officially trademarked the sound process in The Cavalier and another 1928 release, The Toilers (see entry), as “Tiffany Tone.”
       The film debuted in theaters on 30 Oct 1928 at New York City’s Embassy Theatre, where it was presented as a “special run” feature with tickets priced at $1.50. A negative review in the 7 Nov 1928 Var criticized Tiffany-Stahl’s decision to release the film in such a manner, as it was no more than a typical Western suited for neighborhood theaters. Lead actor Richard Talmadge, known for his stunts, was praised for his acrobatic performance in several reviews, including the 27 Oct 1928 Motion Picture News, which stated, “Talmadge swings by his lariat from treetop to roof, by chandelier from staircase to balcony, vaults over walls and into the saddle, [and] fights off dozens of antagonists.” The same review lamented that a song sequence, in which “Taki” was shown singing, was poorly synchronized.
       A 27 Oct 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World item noted a private screening recently took place at RCA’s studio on Fifth Avenue in New York City, in which press sheets prepared by Tiffany-Stahl’s Al Selig were distributed. ...

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The name of scenarist Victor Irvin is a pseudonym for director Irvin Willat.
       An advertisement in the 25 Apr 1928 Film Daily noted that The Cavalier was “in the course of production.” The film was set to music and synchronized sound effects, both by Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld, via the RCA Photophone process. A 19 Sep 1928 Var article stated that Tiffany-Stahl Productions had officially trademarked the sound process in The Cavalier and another 1928 release, The Toilers (see entry), as “Tiffany Tone.”
       The film debuted in theaters on 30 Oct 1928 at New York City’s Embassy Theatre, where it was presented as a “special run” feature with tickets priced at $1.50. A negative review in the 7 Nov 1928 Var criticized Tiffany-Stahl’s decision to release the film in such a manner, as it was no more than a typical Western suited for neighborhood theaters. Lead actor Richard Talmadge, known for his stunts, was praised for his acrobatic performance in several reviews, including the 27 Oct 1928 Motion Picture News, which stated, “Talmadge swings by his lariat from treetop to roof, by chandelier from staircase to balcony, vaults over walls and into the saddle, [and] fights off dozens of antagonists.” The same review lamented that a song sequence, in which “Taki” was shown singing, was poorly synchronized.
       A 27 Oct 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World item noted a private screening recently took place at RCA’s studio on Fifth Avenue in New York City, in which press sheets prepared by Tiffany-Stahl’s Al Selig were distributed.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
27 Oct 1928
p. 24
Film Daily
25 Apr 1928
p. 2
Film Daily
4 Nov 1928
---
Harrison's Reports
11 Aug 1928
p. 126
Motion Picture News
25 Aug 1928
p. 609
Motion Picture News
15 Sep 1928
p. 830
Motion Picture News
27 Oct 1928
p. 1286
New York Times
29 Oct 1928
p. 21
New York Times
31 Oct 1928
p. 28
Variety
12 Sep 1928
p. 5
Variety
19 Sep 1928
p. 23
Variety
31 Oct 1928
p. 9
Variety
7 Nov 1928
p. 15
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld
Mus score
SOUND
Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld
Sd eff
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Black Rider" by Max Brand in Western Story (3 Jan 1925).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"My Cavalier," music by Hugo Riesenfeld, lyrics by R. Meredith Willson.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 November 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 30 Oct 1928 at the Embassy Theatre
Production Date:
spring 1928
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Tiffany-Stahl Productions, Inc.
15 June 1928
LP25389
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Sd eff via RCA Photophone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69
Length(in feet):
6,775
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

El Caballero, a mysterious knight errant, is beloved by the poor, hated by the rich, and feared by the haughty. He sets out to save Lucía D’Arquista, a Spanish girl of noble birth, from an unwanted marriage to the villainous Ramon Torreno, the son of a wealthy Californian. By day, El Caballero disguises himself as “Taki,” an Aztec servant, but by night, he becomes an invincible defender of the weak. Although he is caught and bound multiple times in his attempt to rescue Lucía, El Caballero outwits Ramon Torreno and Sergeant Juan Dinero, and eventually wins the girl’s affection. El Caballero, who is actually a Spanish don, marries Lucía, and the two return to Spain together. ...

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El Caballero, a mysterious knight errant, is beloved by the poor, hated by the rich, and feared by the haughty. He sets out to save Lucía D’Arquista, a Spanish girl of noble birth, from an unwanted marriage to the villainous Ramon Torreno, the son of a wealthy Californian. By day, El Caballero disguises himself as “Taki,” an Aztec servant, but by night, he becomes an invincible defender of the weak. Although he is caught and bound multiple times in his attempt to rescue Lucía, El Caballero outwits Ramon Torreno and Sergeant Juan Dinero, and eventually wins the girl’s affection. El Caballero, who is actually a Spanish don, marries Lucía, and the two return to Spain together.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.