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HISTORY

According to items in the 23 Sep 1923 FD and 20 Oct 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, principal photography concluded sometime in the fall of that year.
       The picture was extremely popular and well-loved by both critics and audiences, many of whom regarded it as Johnny Hines's best work to date. On 1 Mar 1924, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Metropolitan Theatre patrons in Baltimore, MD, protested the end of its theatrical run, prompting management to substitute the new picture with additional screenings of Conductor 1492. ...

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According to items in the 23 Sep 1923 FD and 20 Oct 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review, principal photography concluded sometime in the fall of that year.
       The picture was extremely popular and well-loved by both critics and audiences, many of whom regarded it as Johnny Hines's best work to date. On 1 Mar 1924, Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Metropolitan Theatre patrons in Baltimore, MD, protested the end of its theatrical run, prompting management to substitute the new picture with additional screenings of Conductor 1492.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
20 Oct 1923
p. 952
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Mar 1924
p. 22
Film Daily
23 Mar 1924
---
Film Daily
23 Sep 1923
p. 8
Moving Picture World
23 Feb 1924
---
Variety
19 Mar 1924
p. 27
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 January 1924
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
25 December 1923
LP20761
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,500
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Terry O'Toole, a young Irishman, arrives in America and gets a job as a streetcar conductor. He rescues the son of company president Denman Connelly; foils the attempts of crooks to gain control of the company; and marries Connelly's daughter, ...

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Terry O'Toole, a young Irishman, arrives in America and gets a job as a streetcar conductor. He rescues the son of company president Denman Connelly; foils the attempts of crooks to gain control of the company; and marries Connelly's daughter, Noretta.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.