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HISTORY

The 22 July 1916 Motion Picture News announced that Henry McRae was currently filming Behind the Lines at the Universal City studios. Edwin N. Wallock, playing "General Dominquez," had himself made up to look like Mexican Army General Alvaro Obregon, leader of the Mexican Revolution at the time this film was made.
       According to the 2 September 1916 Moving Picture World, "Mr. McRae took his company to Lower California, where the military features were pictured in authentic locations." Lower California is more commonly known as the state of Baja California, Mexico. (Another item in the same issue more directly stated that McRae had taken "his large company to Mexico for authentic locations.) The first item also gave 18 September 1916 as an opening date for the film, and noted that the scenario was adapted from Mary Rider's "published novel," although no such book could be found.
       The 5 August 1915 Moving Picture Weekly reported that "a cartridge clip belt once owned by Gen. Francisco [Pancho] Villa" was used in Behind the Lines. Villa had declared that "it was too heavy and gave it to Ivor McFadden, one of the Universal City actors, who at that time was filming pictures in Mexico. McFadden loaned it to [Ray] Hanford for use in the film play."
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, a fragment of this film is extant. ...

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The 22 July 1916 Motion Picture News announced that Henry McRae was currently filming Behind the Lines at the Universal City studios. Edwin N. Wallock, playing "General Dominquez," had himself made up to look like Mexican Army General Alvaro Obregon, leader of the Mexican Revolution at the time this film was made.
       According to the 2 September 1916 Moving Picture World, "Mr. McRae took his company to Lower California, where the military features were pictured in authentic locations." Lower California is more commonly known as the state of Baja California, Mexico. (Another item in the same issue more directly stated that McRae had taken "his large company to Mexico for authentic locations.) The first item also gave 18 September 1916 as an opening date for the film, and noted that the scenario was adapted from Mary Rider's "published novel," although no such book could be found.
       The 5 August 1915 Moving Picture Weekly reported that "a cartridge clip belt once owned by Gen. Francisco [Pancho] Villa" was used in Behind the Lines. Villa had declared that "it was too heavy and gave it to Ivor McFadden, one of the Universal City actors, who at that time was filming pictures in Mexico. McFadden loaned it to [Ray] Hanford for use in the film play."
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, a fragment of this film is extant.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
22 Jul 1916
p. 422
Motion Picture News
29 Jul 1916
p. 607
Motion Picture News
16 Sep 1916
p. 1725
Moving Picture Weekly
5 Aug 1916
p. 23
Moving Picture World
2 Sep 1916
p. 1556, 1561
Moving Picture World
16 Sep 1916
p. 1822
Moving Picture World
23 Sep 1916
p. 2034
New York Clipper
23 Sep 1916
p. 36
NYDM
5 Feb 1916
p. 715
Variety
15 Sep 1916
p. 25
Wid's
7 Sep 1916
p. 844
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 September 1916
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Blue Bird Photoplays, Inc.
28 August 1916
LP9021
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

During a rebellion in Mexico, Nina Garcia, a diplomat's daughter, is forced to become a spy for the revolutionaries in order to save her sister Camilla, who is being held hostage after their brother, Carlos, has been shot. Nina works as a nurse in a military hospital and steals papers for the rebels, but officials finally discover her involvement in enemy espionage. Just as soldiers arrest her, she performs an experiment on herself, hoping to prove the worth of Dr. Ralph Hamlin's serum for gangrene. Unimpressed by Nina's bravery and unmoved by Ralph's pleas for a pardon, the government orders her shot after her recovery from the injection. Fortunately, United States troops, reacting to an incursion into an American border town by Mexican rebels, arrive and save Nina from ...

More Less

During a rebellion in Mexico, Nina Garcia, a diplomat's daughter, is forced to become a spy for the revolutionaries in order to save her sister Camilla, who is being held hostage after their brother, Carlos, has been shot. Nina works as a nurse in a military hospital and steals papers for the rebels, but officials finally discover her involvement in enemy espionage. Just as soldiers arrest her, she performs an experiment on herself, hoping to prove the worth of Dr. Ralph Hamlin's serum for gangrene. Unimpressed by Nina's bravery and unmoved by Ralph's pleas for a pardon, the government orders her shot after her recovery from the injection. Fortunately, United States troops, reacting to an incursion into an American border town by Mexican rebels, arrive and save Nina from execution.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.