Full page view
HISTORY

The 5 Jul 1925 Film Daily reported that Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., had signed Eddie Gribbon to appear in the film, with James Flood as director. Nearly two weeks later, the 18 Jul 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that Roy Del Ruth had replaced Flood, and that the production was to be supervised by Bennie Zeidman . Principal photography was underway by 23 Aug 1925 at the former Vitagraph Studios in Brooklyn, NY, as stated in that day’s Film Daily.
       The 29 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World included champion prizefighters James J. Jeffries, Ad Wolgast, and Tommy Ryan among the cast. Comedian Ben Turpin reportedly came out of retirement to play a minor role in the film as “a special favor” to Del Ruth. Although the article claimed that Turpin had no intention of resuming his career, the comedian continued to appear in films until his death in 1940.
       In an article for the Mar 1926 issue of Motion Picture, co-star Louise Fazenda recounted the making of a sequence in which she was required to take a fall while her arms were laden with packages. Fazenda accidentally stumbled onto an adjoining stage, interrupting a love scene between John Barrymore and Dolores Costello, who were filming The Sea Beast (1926, see entry). After the embarrassed actress introduced herself, Barrymore responded cordially, inviting her to visit again soon. The close of production was announced in the 28 Aug 1925 Film Daily.
       Hogan’s Alley opened during the week of 21 Nov 1925 at the Warner Theatre ...

More Less

The 5 Jul 1925 Film Daily reported that Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., had signed Eddie Gribbon to appear in the film, with James Flood as director. Nearly two weeks later, the 18 Jul 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that Roy Del Ruth had replaced Flood, and that the production was to be supervised by Bennie Zeidman . Principal photography was underway by 23 Aug 1925 at the former Vitagraph Studios in Brooklyn, NY, as stated in that day’s Film Daily.
       The 29 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World included champion prizefighters James J. Jeffries, Ad Wolgast, and Tommy Ryan among the cast. Comedian Ben Turpin reportedly came out of retirement to play a minor role in the film as “a special favor” to Del Ruth. Although the article claimed that Turpin had no intention of resuming his career, the comedian continued to appear in films until his death in 1940.
       In an article for the Mar 1926 issue of Motion Picture, co-star Louise Fazenda recounted the making of a sequence in which she was required to take a fall while her arms were laden with packages. Fazenda accidentally stumbled onto an adjoining stage, interrupting a love scene between John Barrymore and Dolores Costello, who were filming The Sea Beast (1926, see entry). After the embarrassed actress introduced herself, Barrymore responded cordially, inviting her to visit again soon. The close of production was announced in the 28 Aug 1925 Film Daily.
       Hogan’s Alley opened during the week of 21 Nov 1925 at the Warner Theatre in New York City, followed by a general release on 12 Dec 1925. The 28 Nov 1925 Moving Picture World noted that previews at neighborhood theaters were well-received by audiences. Critical notices were mixed, with several detailing the film’s numerous flaws while admitting to its entertainment value.        The 2 Dec 1925 Var reported that the picture was held over for second week at the Warner, despite poor reviews. Four months later, the 3 Apr 1926 Exhibitors Daily Review declared the film to be one of the two most profitable current releases.
       The 19 Dec 1925 Motion Picture News reported that actress Lina Basquette, wife of studio executive Sam Warner, hosted a “de luxe” screening on 11 Dec 1925 at the Warner Theatre. The audience was comprised of Broadway luminaries, including 150 cast members of current stage shows running at Charles Dillingham theaters. Among the attendees were actors Ina Claire, Marilyn Miller, Richard “Skeets” Gallagher, and Cyril Maude.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review
3 Apr 1926
p. 6
Exhibitors Trade Review
18 Jul 1925
p. 12
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Nov 1925
p. 32
Film Daily
5 Jul 1925
p. 10
Film Daily
23 Aug 1925
---
Film Daily
28 Aug 1925
p. 2
Film Daily
25 Aug 1925
p. 15
Film Daily
16 Nov 1925
p. 6
Film Daily
29 Nov 1925
p. 6
Motion Picture
Mar 1926
p. 108
Motion Picture News
5 Dec 1925
p. 2687
Motion Picture News
19 Dec 1925
p. 2985
Moving Picture World
29 Aug 1925
p. 937
Moving Picture World
28 Nov 1925
p. 333
Moving Picture World
5 Dec 1925
p. 482
Moving Picture World
12 Dec 1925
p. 551
New York Times
24 Nov 1925
p. 28
Photoplay
Feb 1926
p. 116
Variety
25 Nov 1925
p. 39
Variety
2 Dec 1925
p. 29
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 December 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 21 Nov 1925
Production Date:
Aug 1925
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
7 November 1925
LP21983
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,875
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In the New York City neighborhood known as "Hogan's Alley," pugilist Lefty O'Brien becomes engaged to local tomboy Patsy Ryan, against the wishes of her father, Michael. During a championship fight with Battling Savage, Lefty breaks his left hand and leaves his opponent close to death. Believing he is in trouble with the law, Lefty finds refuge with Patsy, but her father turns the young couple out. When Patsy is injured, Michael seeks help from wealthy Dr. Emmett Franklin, who takes more than a professional interest in his patient. He invites Michael and Patsy to a dinner that turns into a wild party. Lefty crashes the event and demands that Patsy leave with him; she refuses and returns his engagement ring. The doctor invites father and daughter to his mountain lodge, then leaves Michael stranded at the railroad station. Lefty comes to Michael’s aid and they pursue the train in an automobile. The two vehicles collide and a portion of the train breaks loose. Patsy is trapped inside a runaway car, and Lefty employs an airplane to rescues her. The two lovers marry and make their fortune in plumbing, much to Michael's ...

More Less

In the New York City neighborhood known as "Hogan's Alley," pugilist Lefty O'Brien becomes engaged to local tomboy Patsy Ryan, against the wishes of her father, Michael. During a championship fight with Battling Savage, Lefty breaks his left hand and leaves his opponent close to death. Believing he is in trouble with the law, Lefty finds refuge with Patsy, but her father turns the young couple out. When Patsy is injured, Michael seeks help from wealthy Dr. Emmett Franklin, who takes more than a professional interest in his patient. He invites Michael and Patsy to a dinner that turns into a wild party. Lefty crashes the event and demands that Patsy leave with him; she refuses and returns his engagement ring. The doctor invites father and daughter to his mountain lodge, then leaves Michael stranded at the railroad station. Lefty comes to Michael’s aid and they pursue the train in an automobile. The two vehicles collide and a portion of the train breaks loose. Patsy is trapped inside a runaway car, and Lefty employs an airplane to rescues her. The two lovers marry and make their fortune in plumbing, much to Michael's pleasure.

Less

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Boxing


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Cape Fear

The film is bookended by scenes in which “Danielle Bowden” recites a reminiscence of the incident at Cape Fear that she wrote for a school assignment.
       A 31 Jul ... >>

Tokyo Joe

According to a 10 Dec 1948 HR news item, 2d unit director Art Black and cameramen Joseph Biroc and Emil Oster, Jr. shot 40,000 feet of background ... >>

The Princess Bride

The synopsis and history for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Synopsis and history were written by Fitrah Hamid, a student at Georgia ... >>

Frankenstein

Screen credits list "The Monster" as played by "?" in the opening cast list. The "?" is replaced by Boris Karloff's name in the end credits. Mary Shelley's ... >>

Man in the Attic

Marie Belloc Lowndes' popular novel first appeared as a short story in McClure's in Jan 1911. Although HR news items include Michael Pate and ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.