Hungry Hearts (1922)

84 mins | Drama | 10 September 1922

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HISTORY

The Summary for Hungry Hearts is based on contemporary sources, including the 9 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review and Mar 1923 Motion Picture Magazine, and a short preview of the restored film.
       The film was an adaptation of Anzia Yezierska’s short story, “The Lost Beautifulness,” but took its title from the book of stories, Hungry Hearts, in which it was published. Originally, Goldwyn Pictures planned to adapt to the screen “The Fat of the Land,” the earliest (1919) of Miss Yezierska’s short stories later gathered in the book Hungry Hearts, according to the 12 Feb 1921 Motion Picture News. Goldwyn brought the author to the Culver City studios to “assist in the production.” However, no film under that title was ever released.
       Ethel Kay was originally set to star in Hungry Heart, according to the 29 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News, but she became ill and had to be replaced by Helen Ferguson.
       The 5 Nov 1921 Motion Picture News noted that production had resumed on Hungry Hearts. A month later, the 3 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News announced that the film was finished. The 3 Jun 1922 Moving Picture World reported that Montague Glass, a popular author and playwright who specialized in comic Jewish dialect, would write the titles.
       Hungry Hearts opened at the Capitol Theatre on New York City’s Broadway for the week of 10 Sep 1922. According to the 29 Nov 1922 FD, the film was the centerpiece of a musical program and a short film, ... More Less

The Summary for Hungry Hearts is based on contemporary sources, including the 9 Dec 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review and Mar 1923 Motion Picture Magazine, and a short preview of the restored film.
       The film was an adaptation of Anzia Yezierska’s short story, “The Lost Beautifulness,” but took its title from the book of stories, Hungry Hearts, in which it was published. Originally, Goldwyn Pictures planned to adapt to the screen “The Fat of the Land,” the earliest (1919) of Miss Yezierska’s short stories later gathered in the book Hungry Hearts, according to the 12 Feb 1921 Motion Picture News. Goldwyn brought the author to the Culver City studios to “assist in the production.” However, no film under that title was ever released.
       Ethel Kay was originally set to star in Hungry Heart, according to the 29 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News, but she became ill and had to be replaced by Helen Ferguson.
       The 5 Nov 1921 Motion Picture News noted that production had resumed on Hungry Hearts. A month later, the 3 Dec 1921 Motion Picture News announced that the film was finished. The 3 Jun 1922 Moving Picture World reported that Montague Glass, a popular author and playwright who specialized in comic Jewish dialect, would write the titles.
       Hungry Hearts opened at the Capitol Theatre on New York City’s Broadway for the week of 10 Sep 1922. According to the 29 Nov 1922 FD, the film was the centerpiece of a musical program and a short film, The Fortune Hunter, from the Aesop’s Fables series. It ran within roughly the same program at Los Angeles’s Miller California Theatre, where it did “very good business” and received favorable reviews in local newspapers, according to the 6 Jan 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review.
       The National Center for Jewish Film (jewishfilm.org) restored Hungry Hearts and added new English subtitles. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
9 Dec 22
p. 107.
Film Daily
30 Aug 1922
p. 2.
Film Daily
29 Nov 1922.
---
Motion Picture Magazine
Mar 1923
p. 57, 96.
Motion Picture News
12 Feb 1921
p. 1350.
Motion Picture News
29 Oct 1921
p. 2352.
Motion Picture News
5 Nov 1921
p. 2452.
Motion Picture News
3 Dec 1921
p. 2960.
Moving Picture World
3 Jun 1922
p. 471, 476.
New York Times
27 Nov 22
p. 18.
Variety
1 Dec 22
p. 34.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Lost Beautifulness," from the book of short stories, Hungry Hearts, by Anzia Yezierska (Boston, 1920).
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 September 1922
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 10 September 1922
Production Date:
November 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Goldwyn Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 November 1922
Copyright Number:
LP18529
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
6,540
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Abraham and Hannah Levin and their children come to the U. S. from Russia in hope of a better life, but find it difficult making a living in New York City’s Lower East Side, even with everybody working. However, beautiful daughter Sara Levin, who works as a janitress, becomes sweethearts with David Kaplan, a struggling young lawyer who teaches her to read and write English. Kaplan’s uncle, Rosenblatt, who is also the Levins’s landlord, disapproves of the relationship and tries to break it off. When he raises the rent on the family’s three dark and tiny rooms to force them out, an enraged Hannah Levin, who has been painting the kitchen white so that she may enjoy its “beautifulness,” destroys her improvements to the tenement apartment, an act for which she must stand trial. Kaplan successfully defends Hannah, marries Sara, and moves the Levin family out of the ghetto and into a suburban ... +


Abraham and Hannah Levin and their children come to the U. S. from Russia in hope of a better life, but find it difficult making a living in New York City’s Lower East Side, even with everybody working. However, beautiful daughter Sara Levin, who works as a janitress, becomes sweethearts with David Kaplan, a struggling young lawyer who teaches her to read and write English. Kaplan’s uncle, Rosenblatt, who is also the Levins’s landlord, disapproves of the relationship and tries to break it off. When he raises the rent on the family’s three dark and tiny rooms to force them out, an enraged Hannah Levin, who has been painting the kitchen white so that she may enjoy its “beautifulness,” destroys her improvements to the tenement apartment, an act for which she must stand trial. Kaplan successfully defends Hannah, marries Sara, and moves the Levin family out of the ghetto and into a suburban home. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.