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HISTORY

The upcoming production was announced in the 29 January 1919 Wid’s Daily by its working title, Jeanne of the Gutter. Principal photography began soon after at Metro Studios in Hollywood, CA, as stated in the 15 February 1919 Motion Picture News. Director-general Maxwell Karger was credited with supervising the production, and with selecting the cast, which reportedly included Bob Walker as the leading man, and Leo Pearson in a supporting role. Also joining the production were Joseph Kilgour (3 May 1919 Moving Picture World) and dancer Maree Beaudet, who was identified in the 23 August 1919 Motion Picture News as “Marie Beaudet. The 1 March 1919 issue reported the completion of filming.
       Four weeks later, the 29 March 1919 Moving Picture World announced the film’s official title as The Parisian Tigress. John Ince was credited as director, although the majority of sources credit Herbert Blaché.
       The film was released on 31 March 1919, followed by a 20 April 1919 opening at the Hippodrome Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. A letter to the August 1919 Photoplay noted that all signage in the picture was written in French, except for one sign in the “den of the ‘apaches,’” which advertised “Café, Beers & Liquors.”
       The scenario was adapted as a short story by Beatrice Milyr for the May 1919 Photo-Play Journal.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.
...

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The upcoming production was announced in the 29 January 1919 Wid’s Daily by its working title, Jeanne of the Gutter. Principal photography began soon after at Metro Studios in Hollywood, CA, as stated in the 15 February 1919 Motion Picture News. Director-general Maxwell Karger was credited with supervising the production, and with selecting the cast, which reportedly included Bob Walker as the leading man, and Leo Pearson in a supporting role. Also joining the production were Joseph Kilgour (3 May 1919 Moving Picture World) and dancer Maree Beaudet, who was identified in the 23 August 1919 Motion Picture News as “Marie Beaudet. The 1 March 1919 issue reported the completion of filming.
       Four weeks later, the 29 March 1919 Moving Picture World announced the film’s official title as The Parisian Tigress. John Ince was credited as director, although the majority of sources credit Herbert Blaché.
       The film was released on 31 March 1919, followed by a 20 April 1919 opening at the Hippodrome Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. A letter to the August 1919 Photoplay noted that all signage in the picture was written in French, except for one sign in the “den of the ‘apaches,’” which advertised “Café, Beers & Liquors.”
       The scenario was adapted as a short story by Beatrice Milyr for the May 1919 Photo-Play Journal.
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
20 Apr 1919
p. 10
Camera
11 Oct 1919
p. 9
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
19 Apr 1919
p. 37
Exhibitors Trade Review
5 Apr 1919
p. 1375
Motion Picture News
15 Feb 1919
p. 1021
Motion Picture News
1 Mar 1919
p. 1394
Motion Picture News
12 Apr 1919
p. 2355
Motion Picture News
26 Apr 1919
p. 2689
Motion Picture News
23 Aug 1919
p. 1643
Moving Picture World
22 Feb 1919
p. 1069
Moving Picture World
29 Mar 1919
p. 1826, 1830
Moving Picture World
12 Apr 1919
p. 271
Moving Picture World
3 May 1919
p. 696
Photoplay
Aug 1919
p. 120
Photo-Play Journal
May 1919
p. 10
Wid's Daily
29 Jan 1919
---
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Jeanne of the Gutter
Release Date:
31 March 1919
Production Date:
late Jan--late Feb 1919
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Pictures Corp.
4 April 1919
LP13567
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The invalid Count de Suchet tells his friend, artist Henri Dutray, about the tragic events of his early life. He secretly married a dancer, and after she gave birth to a daughter, his father convinced her that she was ruining her husband's life. She gave the baby to an elderly couple and then killed herself. The grieving count now hopes for a reunion with his daughter before he dies. Meanwhile, Jeanne, an Apache dancer in Paris, France, refuses to be sold by her brother, Jacques, to an old rogue. She escapes, and when Henri finds her hiding in his studio, the artist, desperate for money, plots with Jacques to make the count believe that Jeanne is his daughter. Although Jeanne rebels at first, she moves in with the count and grows to love him. She also falls in love with aristocrat Albert Chauroy, but her shame prevents her from marrying him. Following the count’s death, Jacques robs his safe and finds a photograph of Jeanne's mother. The butler shoots Jacques, who reveals with his dying breath that Jeanne really is the count's daughter. With her conscience cleared, Jeanne is free to marry ...

More Less

The invalid Count de Suchet tells his friend, artist Henri Dutray, about the tragic events of his early life. He secretly married a dancer, and after she gave birth to a daughter, his father convinced her that she was ruining her husband's life. She gave the baby to an elderly couple and then killed herself. The grieving count now hopes for a reunion with his daughter before he dies. Meanwhile, Jeanne, an Apache dancer in Paris, France, refuses to be sold by her brother, Jacques, to an old rogue. She escapes, and when Henri finds her hiding in his studio, the artist, desperate for money, plots with Jacques to make the count believe that Jeanne is his daughter. Although Jeanne rebels at first, she moves in with the count and grows to love him. She also falls in love with aristocrat Albert Chauroy, but her shame prevents her from marrying him. Following the count’s death, Jacques robs his safe and finds a photograph of Jeanne's mother. The butler shoots Jacques, who reveals with his dying breath that Jeanne really is the count's daughter. With her conscience cleared, Jeanne is free to marry Albert.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.