Lights of Old Broadway (1925)

Romance | 1925

Director:

Monta Bell

Writer:

Carey Wilson

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Production Company:

Cosmopolitan Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

The 7 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had purchased film rights to the successful 1924 Broadway play, Merry Wives of Gotham, written by Laurence Eyre. According to the 8 Mar 1925 FD, M-G-M would co-produce the picture with Cosmopolitan Productions, owned by William Randolph Hearst, as a vehicle for Hearst’s paramour, Marion Davies. As part of the deal, Davies would receive a percentage of the film’s profits, as well as her salary, and the picture would be distributed by M-G-M. The 28 Mar 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Marion Davies would receive a $10,000 per week salary from M-G-M to star in two pictures, including The Merry Wives of Gotham.
       The 9 May 1925 Moving Picture World stated that production was expected to begin at the end of that month at the M-G-M studios in Culver City, CA. Monta Bell was signed as the director, as reported in the 23 May 1925 Motion Picture News.
       Noting the title change to Lights of Old New York, the 6 Jun 1925 Motion Picture News announced that principal photography would begin within the next few days. However, on 13 Jun 1925, Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that Bell was currently casting the picture.
       The 18 Jul 1925 Motion Picture News listed the final title change to Lights of Old Broadway.
       According to the 8 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World, seventeen and nineteen-year-old sisters, Lenore and Virginia Bushman, had been cast in small roles in the film.
       Hearst and Davies were reportedly unhappy ... More Less

The 7 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had purchased film rights to the successful 1924 Broadway play, Merry Wives of Gotham, written by Laurence Eyre. According to the 8 Mar 1925 FD, M-G-M would co-produce the picture with Cosmopolitan Productions, owned by William Randolph Hearst, as a vehicle for Hearst’s paramour, Marion Davies. As part of the deal, Davies would receive a percentage of the film’s profits, as well as her salary, and the picture would be distributed by M-G-M. The 28 Mar 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Marion Davies would receive a $10,000 per week salary from M-G-M to star in two pictures, including The Merry Wives of Gotham.
       The 9 May 1925 Moving Picture World stated that production was expected to begin at the end of that month at the M-G-M studios in Culver City, CA. Monta Bell was signed as the director, as reported in the 23 May 1925 Motion Picture News.
       Noting the title change to Lights of Old New York, the 6 Jun 1925 Motion Picture News announced that principal photography would begin within the next few days. However, on 13 Jun 1925, Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that Bell was currently casting the picture.
       The 18 Jul 1925 Motion Picture News listed the final title change to Lights of Old Broadway.
       According to the 8 Aug 1925 Moving Picture World, seventeen and nineteen-year-old sisters, Lenore and Virginia Bushman, had been cast in small roles in the film.
       Hearst and Davies were reportedly unhappy with “the rapidity of the making” of the picture, which completed principal photography after four weeks, and M-G-M ordered fifty retakes to be made to their satisfaction by Marshall Neilan, as announced in the 26 Aug 1925 Var.
       The 17 Oct 1925 Motion Picture News reported that the film’s premiere would be held on 31 Oct 1925 at the Loew's State Theatre in Los Angeles.
       The 4 Nov 1925 Var review deemed Lights of Old Broadway “a corking picture,” and the 8 Nov 1925 FD review called the picture “delightful,” “first rate,” and a “charming romantic story.”
       Lights of Old Broadway was fully restored by Film Foundation, an organization founded in 1990 by director Martin Scorsese. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Mar 1925
p. 24.
Exhibitors Trade Review
13 Jun 1925
p. 34.
Film Daily
8 Mar 1925
p. 1.
Film Daily
8 Nov 1925
p. 4.
Motion Picture Magazine
Jun 1925
p. 100.
Motion Picture News
23 May 1925
p. 2527.
Motion Picture News
6 Jun 1925
p. 2763.
Motion Picture News
4 Jul 1925.
---
Motion Picture News
18 Jul 1925
p. 297.
Motion Picture News
17 Oct 1925
p. 1801.
Motion Picture News
14 Nov 1925
p. 2357.
Moving Picture World
7 Mar 1925
p. 87.
Moving Picture World
9 May 1925
p. 190.
Moving Picture World
18 Jul 1925
p. 347.
Moving Picture World
8 Aug 1925
p. 654.
Moving Picture World
29 Aug 1925
p. 938.
New York Times
2 Nov 1925
p. 20.
Variety
26 Aug 1925
p. 61.
Variety
4 Nov 1925
p. 42.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Merry Wives of Gotham
Lights of Old New York
The Merry Wives of Gotham
Release Date:
1925
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere at Loew's State Theatre: 31 October 1925
New York opening: 1 November 1925
release: 18 October or 8 November 1925
Production Date:
began June 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Copyright Date:
5 November 1925
Copyright Number:
LP22049
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,595
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Fely and Anne are twins orphaned when their mother dies en route from Ireland to America. Fely is adopted by the O'Tandys, who live in New York's Shantytown, and Anne is adopted by the wealthy De Rhondos. Fely grows up without knowing her sister and becomes a dancer in Tony Pastor's theater. Dirk De Rhondo, Anne's stepbrother, is attracted to Fely, and after protecting her during the great Orangemen's riot falls in love with her. She consents to his proposal but later retracts when Dirk's father dispossesses her family. Fely's father, however, becomes wealthy when his investment in Edison's incandescent light pays off, but Dirk's father is ruined. Fely saves De Rhondo's bank from a run by making a large deposit, thus winning over Dirk's family and paving the way for their ... +


Fely and Anne are twins orphaned when their mother dies en route from Ireland to America. Fely is adopted by the O'Tandys, who live in New York's Shantytown, and Anne is adopted by the wealthy De Rhondos. Fely grows up without knowing her sister and becomes a dancer in Tony Pastor's theater. Dirk De Rhondo, Anne's stepbrother, is attracted to Fely, and after protecting her during the great Orangemen's riot falls in love with her. She consents to his proposal but later retracts when Dirk's father dispossesses her family. Fely's father, however, becomes wealthy when his investment in Edison's incandescent light pays off, but Dirk's father is ruined. Fely saves De Rhondo's bank from a run by making a large deposit, thus winning over Dirk's family and paving the way for their marriage. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.