Little Old New York (1923)

108 mins | Romantic comedy | 4 November 1923

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HISTORY

The 6 Jan 1923 Moving Picture World reported that filming was in progress at the “Cosmopolitan Corporation studio at 127th Street and 2nd Avenue” in New York City. The production featured of replica of the Clermont, the first steamship built by inventor Robert Fulton. Following its construction, the vessel retraced the route of the original Clermont along the Hudson River. The 20 Jan 1923 Moving Picture World listed actress Alma Tell in the role of “Ariana duPuyster,” and Montague Love as “John Jacob Astor.” They were later replaced by Gypsy O’Brien and Andrew Dillon, respectively. On 26 Jan 1923, FD announced a luncheon that afternoon for members of the press, hosted by actress Marion Davies at the 23rd Regiment armory in Brooklyn, NY, which housed the film’s enormous city street set. Estimated at 250 feet in depth, it was said to be the largest interior set ever built for a motion picture. The 10 Feb 1923 Moving Picture World reported that the guests were invited to witness the filming of a scene requiring 1,000 extras. According to the 27 Jan 1923 Moving Picture World, the film also included a scene in which three characters lept from the Clermont into the chilly Hudson River. The actors were supplied by the Coney Island Polar Bear Club, whose members enjoyed swimming in the Atlantic Ocean during winter.
       The 20 Feb 1923 FD reported that the Cosmopolitan studio was damaged by fire, resulting in a loss of $500,000 to $600,000, all of which was covered by ... More Less

The 6 Jan 1923 Moving Picture World reported that filming was in progress at the “Cosmopolitan Corporation studio at 127th Street and 2nd Avenue” in New York City. The production featured of replica of the Clermont, the first steamship built by inventor Robert Fulton. Following its construction, the vessel retraced the route of the original Clermont along the Hudson River. The 20 Jan 1923 Moving Picture World listed actress Alma Tell in the role of “Ariana duPuyster,” and Montague Love as “John Jacob Astor.” They were later replaced by Gypsy O’Brien and Andrew Dillon, respectively. On 26 Jan 1923, FD announced a luncheon that afternoon for members of the press, hosted by actress Marion Davies at the 23rd Regiment armory in Brooklyn, NY, which housed the film’s enormous city street set. Estimated at 250 feet in depth, it was said to be the largest interior set ever built for a motion picture. The 10 Feb 1923 Moving Picture World reported that the guests were invited to witness the filming of a scene requiring 1,000 extras. According to the 27 Jan 1923 Moving Picture World, the film also included a scene in which three characters lept from the Clermont into the chilly Hudson River. The actors were supplied by the Coney Island Polar Bear Club, whose members enjoyed swimming in the Atlantic Ocean during winter.
       The 20 Feb 1923 FD reported that the Cosmopolitan studio was damaged by fire, resulting in a loss of $500,000 to $600,000, all of which was covered by insurance. While a ballroom set, comprised of antique furniture and works of art, was completely destroyed, firemen were able to save the negatives for Cosmopolitan’s current productions. Filming resumed at three other locations, the Tilford, Tec-Art, and Jackson studios, while reconstruction was underway.
       The 24 Mar 1923 Moving Picture World reported that production would be completed in the next two weeks. Among the final sequences was an Irish street scene, filmed at the Jackson Studio in Bronx, NY. Joseph Urban was credited as set designer.
       The 23 Feb 1923 FD announced that Cosmopolitan president William Randolph Hearst completed a distribution deal with the Goldwyn Company, effective immediately. However, the 25 Jun 1923 FD revealed that Little Old New York was originally intended for release under Cosmopolitan’s agreement with Famous Players-Lasky, which already had contracts with several exhibitors. Because Goldwyn had not yet begun to sell the film, it was believed that the two distributors could make “adjustments.”
       On 26 Feb 1923, FD reported Hearst’s acquisition of New York City’s Park Theatre, which he renamed the “Cosmopolitan.” The theater was remodeled under the supervision of Joseph Urban at a cost of over $200,000, according to the 28 Apr 1923 Moving Picture World. One week later, the 5 May 1923 Moving Picture World reported that both the theater and the picture were scheduled to open 1 Jun 1923.
       On 19 May 1923, FD announced Marion Davies’s trip to London, England for the 3 Jun 1923 world premiere. Although the film’s domestic release was postponed, Hearst maintained public interest by entering a Cosmopolitan float in 16 Jun 1923 Jubilee Parade in New York City, as noted in the 18 Jun 1923 FD.
       Little Old New York debuted in New York City on 15 Aug 1923 to positive reviews. The 19 Jan 1924 Moving Picture World stated that critic F. W. Mordaunt Hall placed it among the ten best pictures of the year, along with another Marion Davies film, When Knighthood Was in Flower (1923, see entry). A Los Angeles, CA, debut, followed during the week of 30 Sep 1923. An article in the 6 Oct 1923 Moving Picture World implied that the opening-night audience was comprised almost entirely of film stars. After twelve weeks at the Cosmopolitan, Little Old New York began a two-week engagement at New York City’s Capitol Theatre, where it earned $123,110, according to the 8 Dec 1923 Moving Picture World. The film went into general release on 4 Nov 1923.
       Another adaptation of Rida Johnson Young's play was produced by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1940, directed by Henry King and starring Alice Faye and Fred MacMurray (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
26 Jan 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
20 Feb 1923
p. 1.
Film Daily
23 Feb 1923
p. 1.
Film Daily
26 Feb 1923
p. 1.
Film Daily
19 Apr 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
19 May 1923
p. 1.
Film Daily
18 Jun 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
25 Jun 1923
pp. 1-2.
Film Daily
5 Aug 1923.
---
Moving Picture World
6 Jan 1923
p. 68, 72.
Moving Picture World
20 Jan 1923
p. 264.
Moving Picture World
27 Jan 1923
p. 7.
Moving Picture World
10 Feb 1923
p. 540.
Moving Picture World
24 Mar 1923
p. 455.
Moving Picture World
31 Mar 1923
p. 567.
Moving Picture World
28 Apr 1923
p. 905.
Moving Picture World
5 May 1923
p. 79.
Moving Picture World
11 Aug 1923
p. 465.
Moving Picture World
18 Aug 1923
p. 571, 581.
Moving Picture World
29 Sep 1923
p. 435.
Moving Picture World
6 Oct 1923
p. 512.
Moving Picture World
20 Oct 1923
p. 676.
Moving Picture World
27 Oct 1923
p. 759.
Moving Picture World
10 Nov 1923
p. 247.
Moving Picture World
24 Nov 1923
p. 379.
Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1923
p. 571.
Moving Picture World
19 Jan 1924
p. 180.
Moving Picture World
26 Jan 1924
p. 276.
New York Times
2 Aug 1923
p. 10.
Variety
9 Aug 1923
p. 26.
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 November 1923
Premiere Information:
World premiere: 3 June 1923 at the Scala Theatre in London
New York opening: 15 August 1923
Los Angeles opening: 30 September 1923
Production Date:
December 1922--April 1923
Copyright Claimant:
William Randolph Hearst
Copyright Date:
21 September 1923
Copyright Number:
LP19451
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
108
Length(in feet):
10,000, 10,366
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Patricia O'Day comes to America to claim a fortune left to her brother, who has died en route. In that circumstance the fortune should revert to the stepson, Larry Delavan, but disguised as Patrick, her brother, Patricia gets the inheritance and wins the friendship of Larry Delavan when she assists him in financing Robert Fulton's steamship venture. During a riot Patricia reveals her true identity; she and Delavan marry and go to ... +


Patricia O'Day comes to America to claim a fortune left to her brother, who has died en route. In that circumstance the fortune should revert to the stepson, Larry Delavan, but disguised as Patrick, her brother, Patricia gets the inheritance and wins the friendship of Larry Delavan when she assists him in financing Robert Fulton's steamship venture. During a riot Patricia reveals her true identity; she and Delavan marry and go to Ireland. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.