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HISTORY

Contemporary sources disagree on whether the name of the character played by Mabel Normand is Jigs or Puckers; it is likely that the character's name was changed from Puckers to Jigs before the film's release. Melville W. Brown may have written the film's scenario as well as its story. The copyright catalog lists the film's length as six, rather than five, reels. ...

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Contemporary sources disagree on whether the name of the character played by Mabel Normand is Jigs or Puckers; it is likely that the character's name was changed from Puckers to Jigs before the film's release. Melville W. Brown may have written the film's scenario as well as its story. The copyright catalog lists the film's length as six, rather than five, reels.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
3 May 1919
p. 1673
MPN
3 May 1919
p. 2898
MPW
3 May 1919
p. 712
Variety
5 Apr 1919
p. 10
Wid's
20 Apr 1919
p. 5
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 April 1919
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Goldwyn Pictures Corp.
9 April 1919
LP13581
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Country bumpkin Jigs, the daughter of Asher and Amy Blodgett, is befriended by Gene Giles, Judge Fisher's nephew. The judge's daughter Blanche is wooed by John Harland because of her father's wealth. As a practical joke to amuse her more sophisticated friends, Blanche invites Jigs to a party at the Fisher home. Jigs is humiliated but finds sympathy from the judge and his other nephew, John Bowers. The judge notices an old ring that Jigs is wearing that night. Harland tries to obtain the ring, but Giles has already taken it. Harland plots against Giles and steals bonds from the judge's safe that Giles is holding there for protection. Jigs is held prisoner in the Blodgett attic where she overhears a plan to kill the judge and place suspicion on Giles. Jigs escapes and warns the judge. Jigs' ring reveals that she is really the judge's daughter whom Amy Blodgett exchanged Blanche for in infancy. Jigs finds happiness with Giles who is ...

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Country bumpkin Jigs, the daughter of Asher and Amy Blodgett, is befriended by Gene Giles, Judge Fisher's nephew. The judge's daughter Blanche is wooed by John Harland because of her father's wealth. As a practical joke to amuse her more sophisticated friends, Blanche invites Jigs to a party at the Fisher home. Jigs is humiliated but finds sympathy from the judge and his other nephew, John Bowers. The judge notices an old ring that Jigs is wearing that night. Harland tries to obtain the ring, but Giles has already taken it. Harland plots against Giles and steals bonds from the judge's safe that Giles is holding there for protection. Jigs is held prisoner in the Blodgett attic where she overhears a plan to kill the judge and place suspicion on Giles. Jigs escapes and warns the judge. Jigs' ring reveals that she is really the judge's daughter whom Amy Blodgett exchanged Blanche for in infancy. Jigs finds happiness with Giles who is exonerated.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.