The Mating Call (1928)

72 mins | Drama | 21 July 1928

Director:

James Cruze

Writer:

Walter Woods

Producer:

Howard Hughes

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Editor:

Walter Woods

Production Company:

The Caddo Co., Inc.
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HISTORY

The 21 Aug 1927 Film Daily announced the recent purchase by Universal Film Mfg. Co. of motion picture rights for Rex Beach’s 1927 novel, The Mating Call. The 1 Dec 1927 Film Daily credited writer Stuart Anthony with adapting the story. An article in the 28 Apr 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World noted that the novel had been serialized in Cosmopolitan magazine before being published in book form.
       On 29 Feb 1928, Var announced that Universal was seeking a buyer for the property, adding that the studio planned to limit costs on its high-budget “Jewel” productions to $60,000. Months later, the 13 Jun 1928 Var revealed that the project had been taken over by The Caddo Co. for release through Paramount Famous Lasky Corp. Production was currently underway at Metropolitan Studios in Hollywood, CA, known at the time of this writing as Sunset Las Palmas Studios. Initial costs for the picture totaled $275,000, of which $50,000 was allocated for screen rights, $125,000 for star Thomas Meighan, and $100,000 for director James Cruze. Nena Quartero was included among the cast, as was Lucien Prival, according to the 4 Aug 1928 Motion Picture News. The 7 Jul 1928 edition noted that the company was currently on location in San Diego, CA, with another shoot planned for nearby Fallbrook, CA. Filming was completed on 26 Jun 1928, as stated in the 30 Jun 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. Days later, the 16 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review ...

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The 21 Aug 1927 Film Daily announced the recent purchase by Universal Film Mfg. Co. of motion picture rights for Rex Beach’s 1927 novel, The Mating Call. The 1 Dec 1927 Film Daily credited writer Stuart Anthony with adapting the story. An article in the 28 Apr 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World noted that the novel had been serialized in Cosmopolitan magazine before being published in book form.
       On 29 Feb 1928, Var announced that Universal was seeking a buyer for the property, adding that the studio planned to limit costs on its high-budget “Jewel” productions to $60,000. Months later, the 13 Jun 1928 Var revealed that the project had been taken over by The Caddo Co. for release through Paramount Famous Lasky Corp. Production was currently underway at Metropolitan Studios in Hollywood, CA, known at the time of this writing as Sunset Las Palmas Studios. Initial costs for the picture totaled $275,000, of which $50,000 was allocated for screen rights, $125,000 for star Thomas Meighan, and $100,000 for director James Cruze. Nena Quartero was included among the cast, as was Lucien Prival, according to the 4 Aug 1928 Motion Picture News. The 7 Jul 1928 edition noted that the company was currently on location in San Diego, CA, with another shoot planned for nearby Fallbrook, CA. Filming was completed on 26 Jun 1928, as stated in the 30 Jun 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. Days later, the 16 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review reported that Meighan had returned to the studio for retakes, along with co-stars Evelyn Brent and Renée Adorée. An item in the 29 Aug 1928 Var revealed that Meighan’s wife, Frances Ring, supplied lyrics for the film’s theme song.
       The Mating Call was released on 21 Jul 1928, followed by a Los Angeles, CA, debut at the Metropolitan Theatre on 28 Sep 1928, and a New York City debut at the Paramount Theatre in Oct 1928. Reviews were lukewarm to negative. However, an article in the 31 Dec 1929 Hollywood Daily Screen World later revealed that producer Howard Hughes earned profits of fifty to 100 percent on three recent pictures, including The Mating Call.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review
16 Jul 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review
1 Oct 1928
p. 3
Exhibitors Daily Review
5 Oct 1926
p. 4
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
28 Apr 1928
p. 64
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
30 Jun 1928
p. 32
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
13 Oct 1928
p. 30
Film Daily
21 Aug 1927
p. 4
Film Daily
1 Dec 1927
p. 4
Film Daily
5 May 1928
p. 1430
Film Daily
14 Oct 1928
---
Film Spectator
29 Sep 1928
pp. 15-16
Harrison's Reports
13 Oct 1928
p. 162
Hollywood Daily Screen World
31 Dec 1929
---
Hollywood Vagabond
22 Sep 1927
p. 3
Motion Picture News
5 May 1928
p. 1430
Motion Picture News
7 Jul 1928
p. 43
Motion Picture News
4 Aug 1928
p. 408
Motion Picture News
8 Sep 1928
p. 820
Motion Picture News
29 Sep 1928
p. 1015
New York Times
8 Oct 1928
p. 14
Variety
29 Feb 1928
p. 11
Variety
13 Jun 1928
p. 11, 19
Variety
15 Aug 1928
p. 14
Variety
29 Aug 1928
p. 57
Variety
10 Oct 1928
p. 15, 22
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Mating Call by Rex Beach (New York, 1927).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Mating Call," by Frances Ring and Martin Roones.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 July 1928
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 28 Sep 1928 at the Metropolitan Theatre; New York opening: Oct 1928 at the Paramount Theatre
Production Date:
ended 26 Jun 1928; resumed mid-Jul 1928
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
The Caddo Co., Inc.
4 September 1928
LP25596
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72
Length(in feet):
6,352
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Following the end of the World War, Leslie Hatton returns to his Florida farm to discover that his wife, Rose, has had their marriage annulled in order to wed wealthy Lon Henderson. Leslie finds solace in farming, while Rose, disheartened by Henderson's infidelity, seeks reconciliation with her first husband. Leslie refuses her, then travels to New York City, where he persuades Russian aristocrat Catherine to marry him in return for a permanent home in the U.S. Jessie, a young girl disillusioned by her affair with Henderson, drowns herself in a pond on Leslie's farm. Henderson heads a tribunal of “The Order,” an organization similar to the Ku Klux Klan, which holds Leslie responsible for Jessie’s suicide. He is sentenced to be flogged, but as the punishment is meted out, letters are presented that exonerate Leslie and link Henderson with the dead girl. As a positive outcome of his ordeal, Leslie realizes that his marriage to Catherine, founded on convenience, has become a marriage of ...

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Following the end of the World War, Leslie Hatton returns to his Florida farm to discover that his wife, Rose, has had their marriage annulled in order to wed wealthy Lon Henderson. Leslie finds solace in farming, while Rose, disheartened by Henderson's infidelity, seeks reconciliation with her first husband. Leslie refuses her, then travels to New York City, where he persuades Russian aristocrat Catherine to marry him in return for a permanent home in the U.S. Jessie, a young girl disillusioned by her affair with Henderson, drowns herself in a pond on Leslie's farm. Henderson heads a tribunal of “The Order,” an organization similar to the Ku Klux Klan, which holds Leslie responsible for Jessie’s suicide. He is sentenced to be flogged, but as the punishment is meted out, letters are presented that exonerate Leslie and link Henderson with the dead girl. As a positive outcome of his ordeal, Leslie realizes that his marriage to Catherine, founded on convenience, has become a marriage of love.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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