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HISTORY

The 24 Jan 1925 Moving Picture World and 31 Jan 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review announced the start of principal photography at the Chadwick Pictures Corp. studios on Long Island, NY. The original story, previously titled The Street Singer, was reportedly written for actress Lila Lee by Garrett Fort. Renamed The Midnight Girl, the production was sixth in a series known as the “Chadwick Nine.” The 21 Feb 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review included character actress Flora Finch among the cast. That same issue noted that theatrical star Bela Lugosi had recently completed his role.
       The 7 Mar 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review listed the release date as 15 Feb 1925, although current articles in that and other publications implied that production was still underway. Lukewarm reviews in the 28 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World and 25 Apr 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review described the film as unoriginal but well-suited to neighborhood theaters.
       On 16 Sep 1925, Var reported that the Adolph Philipp Film Corp. had filed a lawsuit against Chadwick, Garrett Fort, director Wilfred Noy, and writer Jean Conover. The plaintiff claimed that the defendants had plagiarized his 1913 operetta, also titled The Midnight Girl, which he later filmed in 1919. Philipp sought to withdraw the Chadwick production from release and collect $100,000 in damages. According to articles in the 30 Jan 1926 Exhibitors Trade Review and 10 Feb 1926 Var, Chadwick faced an additional lawsuit from Metropolitan Opera star Nina Morgana, who demanded $25,000 in ...

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The 24 Jan 1925 Moving Picture World and 31 Jan 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review announced the start of principal photography at the Chadwick Pictures Corp. studios on Long Island, NY. The original story, previously titled The Street Singer, was reportedly written for actress Lila Lee by Garrett Fort. Renamed The Midnight Girl, the production was sixth in a series known as the “Chadwick Nine.” The 21 Feb 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review included character actress Flora Finch among the cast. That same issue noted that theatrical star Bela Lugosi had recently completed his role.
       The 7 Mar 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review listed the release date as 15 Feb 1925, although current articles in that and other publications implied that production was still underway. Lukewarm reviews in the 28 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World and 25 Apr 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review described the film as unoriginal but well-suited to neighborhood theaters.
       On 16 Sep 1925, Var reported that the Adolph Philipp Film Corp. had filed a lawsuit against Chadwick, Garrett Fort, director Wilfred Noy, and writer Jean Conover. The plaintiff claimed that the defendants had plagiarized his 1913 operetta, also titled The Midnight Girl, which he later filmed in 1919. Philipp sought to withdraw the Chadwick production from release and collect $100,000 in damages. According to articles in the 30 Jan 1926 Exhibitors Trade Review and 10 Feb 1926 Var, Chadwick faced an additional lawsuit from Metropolitan Opera star Nina Morgana, who demanded $25,000 in damages after allegedly being “held up to public contempt.” The suit claimed that the character “Nina” was based on the opera star, and specified a scene in which the singer was surrounded by “semi-nude men and women.” It also mentioned an advertising tagline, which stated that the character “sold her soul to become a prima donna.” Morgana complained that she had suffered “bodily and mental anguish” after being “subjected to taunts and gibes of acquaintances and of others.” Chadwick denied any knowledge of Morgana prior to the suit, and had since ordered their laboratory to substitute a different name for the “Nina” character.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
31 Jan 1925
p. 26
Exhibitors Trade Review
7 Feb 1925
p. 28, 35
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Feb 1925
p. 31, 43
Exhibitors Trade Review
7 Mar 1925
p. 53
Exhibitors Trade Review
25 Apr 1925
p. 47
Exhibitors Trade Review
30 Jan 1926
p. 4
Film Daily
12 Jul 1925
---
Moving Picture World
24 Jan 1925
p. 339
Moving Picture World
7 Mar 1925
p. 89
Moving Picture World
28 Mar 1925
p. 355
Photoplay
May 1925
p. 120
Photoplay
Jun 1925
p. 15
Variety
22 Apr 1925
p. 31
Variety
16 Sep 1925
p. 24
Variety
10 Feb 1926
p. 27
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Street Singer
Release Date:
15 February 1925
Premiere Information:
Providence, RI, opening: week of 21 Apr 1925
Production Date:
Jan 1925
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Chadwick Pictures Corp.
17 March 1925
LP21256
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,300
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Anna, a Russian opera singer, arrives in the U.S. and experiences great difficulty in establishing a career. She meets and falls in love with Don Harmon, orchestra conductor and the son of opera impresario Nicholas Harmon. The elder Harmon discovers that Nina, his temperamental prima donna, is losing her voice and dismisses her. Don hires Anna to dance in a production number, "The Midnight Girl," at the café where he is employed. A theatrical agent working for Nicholas discovers Anna and arranges a meeting with the impresario. When Nicholas makes a sexual advance on Anna, she fires a shot at him, inadvertently wounding Nina, who is hiding behind the curtain. The accident brings Nicholas to his senses, and he is reconciled with his former star. Don marries Anna, and the happy bride becomes a star in the Harmon opera. ...

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Anna, a Russian opera singer, arrives in the U.S. and experiences great difficulty in establishing a career. She meets and falls in love with Don Harmon, orchestra conductor and the son of opera impresario Nicholas Harmon. The elder Harmon discovers that Nina, his temperamental prima donna, is losing her voice and dismisses her. Don hires Anna to dance in a production number, "The Midnight Girl," at the café where he is employed. A theatrical agent working for Nicholas discovers Anna and arranges a meeting with the impresario. When Nicholas makes a sexual advance on Anna, she fires a shot at him, inadvertently wounding Nina, who is hiding behind the curtain. The accident brings Nicholas to his senses, and he is reconciled with his former star. Don marries Anna, and the happy bride becomes a star in the Harmon opera.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Show business


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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