Nina, the Flower Girl (1917)

Drama | 21 January 1917

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HISTORY

Principal photography took place during Dec 1916 at Fine Arts Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to articles in the 10 Dec 1916 LAT and the 23 Dec 1916 Los Angeles Evening Express.
       The 13 Jan 1917 Moving Picture World noted that a “picturesque” artist’s studio set was constructed for a party sequence featuring a six-piece orchestra, female models, and real champagne. Director Lloyd Ingram insisted on the latter, claiming that he was unable to find a “satisfactory substitute.” It was also revealed that screenwriter Mary H. O’Connor, head of the Triangle-Fine Arts scenario department, based her original story on artists she knew in New York City, who adopted an impoverished blind girl and financed an operation to restore her sight.
       Nina, the Flower Girl was scheduled for release on 21 Jan 1917. Openings in Chicago, IL, at the Covent Garden Theatre, and in Brooklyn, NY, at the Triangle Theatre, preceded on 14 Jan 1917. A New York City opening at the Eighty-first Street Theatre followed later that month. ...

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Principal photography took place during Dec 1916 at Fine Arts Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to articles in the 10 Dec 1916 LAT and the 23 Dec 1916 Los Angeles Evening Express.
       The 13 Jan 1917 Moving Picture World noted that a “picturesque” artist’s studio set was constructed for a party sequence featuring a six-piece orchestra, female models, and real champagne. Director Lloyd Ingram insisted on the latter, claiming that he was unable to find a “satisfactory substitute.” It was also revealed that screenwriter Mary H. O’Connor, head of the Triangle-Fine Arts scenario department, based her original story on artists she knew in New York City, who adopted an impoverished blind girl and financed an operation to restore her sight.
       Nina, the Flower Girl was scheduled for release on 21 Jan 1917. Openings in Chicago, IL, at the Covent Garden Theatre, and in Brooklyn, NY, at the Triangle Theatre, preceded on 14 Jan 1917. A New York City opening at the Eighty-first Street Theatre followed later that month.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Brooklyn Daily Eagle [Brooklyn, NY]
14 Jan 1917
p. 15
Chicago Daily Tribune
13 Jan 1917
p. 11
Chicago Daily Tribune
17 Jan 1917
p. 10
Exhibitors Trade Review
20 Jan 1917
p. 490
Los Angeles Evening Express
23 Dec 1916
p. 14
Los Angeles Times
10 Dec 1916
p. 57
Motion Picture News
20 Jan 1917
p. 439
Motion Picture News
26 May 1917
p. 29
Motography
20 Jan 1917
pp. 150, 151
Moving Picture World
13 Jan 1917
p. 248, 251
Moving Picture World
20 Jan 1917
p. 358
Moving Picture World
3 Feb 1917
p. 698, 745
NYDM
13 Jan 1917
p. 26
Variety
12 Jan 1917
p. 24
Wid's Daily
11 Jan 1917
p. 19
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 January 1917
Premiere Information:
Chicago and Brooklyn openings: 14 Jan 1917; New York opening: late Jan 1917
Production Date:
Dec 1916
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Nina, a blind flower girl, sells her artificial bouquets under the watchful eye of Jimmie, the crippled newsboy. One day, the wealthy Fifi Chandler brings Nina to the attention of Fred Townsend, who takes the blind girl to his home with plans to restore her sight. Jimmie watches her from the bleak outside world and, misunderstanding Fred's attentions, attempts to shoot him. Fred explains that he means no harm and assures the boy that Nina will regain her vision. Certain that she will be horrified by his appearance, Jimmie decides to commit suicide. Fred intervenes once again and sends Jimmie to a hospital where his deformities are corrected. The boy returns to Nina to find that she has recovered her sight, and that he has become famous for the plaster images he made of her. She declines a proposal from Fred and embarks on a happy life with ...

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Nina, a blind flower girl, sells her artificial bouquets under the watchful eye of Jimmie, the crippled newsboy. One day, the wealthy Fifi Chandler brings Nina to the attention of Fred Townsend, who takes the blind girl to his home with plans to restore her sight. Jimmie watches her from the bleak outside world and, misunderstanding Fred's attentions, attempts to shoot him. Fred explains that he means no harm and assures the boy that Nina will regain her vision. Certain that she will be horrified by his appearance, Jimmie decides to commit suicide. Fred intervenes once again and sends Jimmie to a hospital where his deformities are corrected. The boy returns to Nina to find that she has recovered her sight, and that he has become famous for the plaster images he made of her. She declines a proposal from Fred and embarks on a happy life with Jimmie.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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