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HISTORY

According to the 6 Feb 1924 FD, James Cruze was scheduled to direct North of 36, but when Jesse L. Lasky announced its production, he turned the movie over to Irwin Willat.
       The 8 Nov 1924 Exhibitors Trade Review reported Willat and part of his company had recently returned from the Miller Brothers' 101 ranch in Oklahoma, where they filmed a buffalo stampede. The Dec 1924 AmCin noted that scenes were also filmed in Texas.
       Chief cinematographer Alfred Gilks detailed the making of North of 36 in an article in the Jan 1925 AmCin. He called North of 36 "a location picture, so to speak. In the two and one-half months that we galloped over the Texas plains, sometimes shooting form a lofty platform and at other times from the lurching floor of a floating wagon, we were not only living under primitive conditions but, cinematographically, we were photographing under like circumstances." He generally had to rely on natural light. The production located a herd of 4,000 long-horn cattle on a huge ranch outside of Houston, TX, at just the time when the owner, Bassett Blakeley, was ready to drive them to market. The cattle drive, which duplicated a similar event in the 1866-75 period of the film, consisted of three covered ox-carts, thirty-two "expert cow-punchers" hired at a Houston rodeo, and an equipment and cooking crew of four. The 4,000 cattle were strung out over a distance of four miles along the old Texas-Kansas cattle trail, Gilks wrote. The film crew kept to the speed of a regular cattle drive, which was from twenty ... More Less

According to the 6 Feb 1924 FD, James Cruze was scheduled to direct North of 36, but when Jesse L. Lasky announced its production, he turned the movie over to Irwin Willat.
       The 8 Nov 1924 Exhibitors Trade Review reported Willat and part of his company had recently returned from the Miller Brothers' 101 ranch in Oklahoma, where they filmed a buffalo stampede. The Dec 1924 AmCin noted that scenes were also filmed in Texas.
       Chief cinematographer Alfred Gilks detailed the making of North of 36 in an article in the Jan 1925 AmCin. He called North of 36 "a location picture, so to speak. In the two and one-half months that we galloped over the Texas plains, sometimes shooting form a lofty platform and at other times from the lurching floor of a floating wagon, we were not only living under primitive conditions but, cinematographically, we were photographing under like circumstances." He generally had to rely on natural light. The production located a herd of 4,000 long-horn cattle on a huge ranch outside of Houston, TX, at just the time when the owner, Bassett Blakeley, was ready to drive them to market. The cattle drive, which duplicated a similar event in the 1866-75 period of the film, consisted of three covered ox-carts, thirty-two "expert cow-punchers" hired at a Houston rodeo, and an equipment and cooking crew of four. The 4,000 cattle were strung out over a distance of four miles along the old Texas-Kansas cattle trail, Gilks wrote. The film crew kept to the speed of a regular cattle drive, which was from twenty to thirty miles a day for the first week and, later, as the cattle got tired, twelve to fifteen miles a day. Many of the shots of the actors were taken during the morning, when the cattle grazed, and at twilight, as the cowboys made camp. The cattle village of Abilene, KS, was built by the set director using mostly local carpenters. Among the buildings erected were a hotel, hardware store, saloon, dancehall, blacksmith shop, livery stable, general store, and a dozen houses, all copied from engravings in old books and newspapers. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Dec 1924
p. 13.
American Cinematographer
Jan 1925
p. 5, 6, 19.
Exhibitors Trade Review
8 Nov 1924
p. 34.
Exhibitors Trade Review
20 Dec 1924
p. 49.
Film Daily
6 Feb 1924
p. 6.
Film Daily
7 Dec 1924.
---
Moving Picture World
13 Dec 1924.
---
New York Times
8 1924
p. 13.
Variety
10 Dec 24
p. 35.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 December 1924
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
10 December 1924
Copyright Number:
LP20843
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,908
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In order to find a market for her cattle, Taisie Lockheart, owner of a large Texas ranch, decides to drive a herd across the thousand miles of Indian territory between the Lone Star State and the new railhead at Abilene. Sim Rudabaugh, the state treasurer, who is amassing a fortune by the accumulation of land scrip, plots to steal the scrip for Taisie's ranch but is foiled by Dan McMasters, who is in love with her. When suspicion unjustly falls on Dan, he is fired by Taisie; he then joins up with Rudabaugh so as to discover Rudabaugh's plans and forestall them. On the trail, Rudabaugh's men stampede Taisie's herd at night, and only the skill of her ranch hands prevents the loss of the cattle. Rudabaugh then kills two Comanche squaws, and the Indians go on the warpath but are fought off by the Lockheart men, led by the foreman, Jim Nabours. After a gala arrival in Abilene, Taisie sells her cattle at $20 a head and Dan overpowers Rudabaugh in a fight, handing him over to the Comanche chief. Taisie and Dan are reconciled and soon get ... +


In order to find a market for her cattle, Taisie Lockheart, owner of a large Texas ranch, decides to drive a herd across the thousand miles of Indian territory between the Lone Star State and the new railhead at Abilene. Sim Rudabaugh, the state treasurer, who is amassing a fortune by the accumulation of land scrip, plots to steal the scrip for Taisie's ranch but is foiled by Dan McMasters, who is in love with her. When suspicion unjustly falls on Dan, he is fired by Taisie; he then joins up with Rudabaugh so as to discover Rudabaugh's plans and forestall them. On the trail, Rudabaugh's men stampede Taisie's herd at night, and only the skill of her ranch hands prevents the loss of the cattle. Rudabaugh then kills two Comanche squaws, and the Indians go on the warpath but are fought off by the Lockheart men, led by the foreman, Jim Nabours. After a gala arrival in Abilene, Taisie sells her cattle at $20 a head and Dan overpowers Rudabaugh in a fight, handing him over to the Comanche chief. Taisie and Dan are reconciled and soon get married. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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