Full page view
HISTORY

A 21 Feb 1926 LAT news item stated that Fox Film Corp. planned to make a film adaptation of Peter B. Kyne’s short story, “Pals in Paradise.” Soon after, the 13 Mar 1926 Motion Picture News listed Pals in Paradise on the slate of Fox releases for May 1926. A 26 Mar 1926 Film Mercury brief indicated that filming had not yet taken place, and named Albert Ray as director and Kenneth Hawks as production supervisor. On 24 Apr 1926, Motion Picture News listed Pals in Paradise as one of seven special productions on the upcoming slate for Metropolitan Pictures Corp. of California, to be released by Producers Distributing Corp. No mention of the Fox production was made.
       George B. Seitz signed on to direct the picture, which was set to mark his first under a new long-term contract with Metropolitan Pictures, the 7 Aug 1926 Moving Picture World noted. Although various contemporary sources mentioned that Pals in Paradise would mark stage actress May Robson’s screen debut, she had previously appeared in feature films dating back to 1915’s How Molly Malone Made Good (see entry).
       Principal photography took place in summer 1926 at Metropolitan’s Hollywood, CA, studio, and on location in Lake Arrowhead, CA, as stated in the Aug 1926 AmCin and 4 Sep 1926 Exhibitors Herald. Preview screenings took place as early as 25 Aug 1926, when the film was scheduled to play at Hanover, PA’s Strand Theatre. A 10 Sep 1926 Film Mercury review of a preview screening at Los Angeles, CA’s Roosevelt ...

More Less

A 21 Feb 1926 LAT news item stated that Fox Film Corp. planned to make a film adaptation of Peter B. Kyne’s short story, “Pals in Paradise.” Soon after, the 13 Mar 1926 Motion Picture News listed Pals in Paradise on the slate of Fox releases for May 1926. A 26 Mar 1926 Film Mercury brief indicated that filming had not yet taken place, and named Albert Ray as director and Kenneth Hawks as production supervisor. On 24 Apr 1926, Motion Picture News listed Pals in Paradise as one of seven special productions on the upcoming slate for Metropolitan Pictures Corp. of California, to be released by Producers Distributing Corp. No mention of the Fox production was made.
       George B. Seitz signed on to direct the picture, which was set to mark his first under a new long-term contract with Metropolitan Pictures, the 7 Aug 1926 Moving Picture World noted. Although various contemporary sources mentioned that Pals in Paradise would mark stage actress May Robson’s screen debut, she had previously appeared in feature films dating back to 1915’s How Molly Malone Made Good (see entry).
       Principal photography took place in summer 1926 at Metropolitan’s Hollywood, CA, studio, and on location in Lake Arrowhead, CA, as stated in the Aug 1926 AmCin and 4 Sep 1926 Exhibitors Herald. Preview screenings took place as early as 25 Aug 1926, when the film was scheduled to play at Hanover, PA’s Strand Theatre. A 10 Sep 1926 Film Mercury review of a preview screening at Los Angeles, CA’s Roosevelt Theatre stated, “It should make a generally good audience picture, after it has gone through a process of re-editing.” A general release of 29 Nov 1926 was cited in the 11 Dec 1926 Moving Picture World, while the film’s New York City debut occurred one week earlier, on 22 Nov 1926, at the Hippodrome Theatre.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Aug 1926
p. 12
Evening Sun [Hanover, PA]
24 Aug 1926
p. 3
Exhibitors Herald
7 Aug 1926
p. 63
Exhibitors Herald
4 Sep 1926
p. 51
Exhibitors Herald
20 Nov 1926
p. 56
Film Daily
8 Aug 1926
p. 11
Film Daily
9 Sep 1926
p. 10
Film Daily
12 Sep 1926
p. 9
Film Daily
12 Dec 1926
p. 12
Film Mercury
26 Mar 1926
p. 5
Film Mercury
10 Sep 1926
p. 7
Fox Folks
Apr 1926
p. 15
Lancaster Eagle-Gazette [Lancaster, OH]
6 Nov 1926
p. 2
Los Angeles Times
21 Feb 1926
p. 36
Los Angeles Times
20 Aug 1926
Section A, p. 10
Los Angeles Times
2 Oct 1926
p. 6
Motion Picture News
13 Mar 1926
p. 1191
Motion Picture News
24 Apr 1926
---
Motion Picture News
3 Jul 1926
p. 34
Motion Picture News
18 Sep 1926
p. 1087
Motion Picture News
18 Sep 1926
p. 1090
Moving Picture World
7 Aug 1926
p. 3
Moving Picture World
11 Sep 1926
p. 118
Moving Picture World
29 Nov 1926
p. 301
Moving Picture World
11 Dec 1926
p. 450
New York Times
21 Nov 1926
---
New York Times
24 Nov 1926
p. 26
Variety
24 Nov 1926
p. 15
Variety
23 Mar 1927
p. 7
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Ed Bernoudy
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
Albert Kenyon
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Pals in Paradise" by Peter B. Kyne (publication undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 November 1926
Premiere Information:
Preview screening in Hanover, PA: 25 Aug 1926; Lancaster, OH, opening: 8 Nov 1926; New York opening: 22 Nov 1926 at Hippodrome
Production Date:
ended Aug or early Sep 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metropolitan Pictures Corp. of California
1 November 1926
LP23281
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,696
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Bill Harvey, a young prospector who has taken over a mining claim belonging to the now-deceased John Howard, strikes gold and precipitates a rush to the California site. With Esther and Abraham Lezinsky, he establishes a town known as Paradise. Geraldine, Howard's daughter, arrives with a claim to her father's mine. Kenton, who has a police record, convinces Jerry that she should fight him and speaks disparagingly of Bill. Jerry accuses Bill of stealing her claim papers, then discovers that he is innocent; however, when he tells her Kenton is a crook, she indignantly declares herself engaged to him. Kenton and his henchmen stage a raid on the express office, and Bill arrests him--winning the confidence and finally the love of ...

More Less

Bill Harvey, a young prospector who has taken over a mining claim belonging to the now-deceased John Howard, strikes gold and precipitates a rush to the California site. With Esther and Abraham Lezinsky, he establishes a town known as Paradise. Geraldine, Howard's daughter, arrives with a claim to her father's mine. Kenton, who has a police record, convinces Jerry that she should fight him and speaks disparagingly of Bill. Jerry accuses Bill of stealing her claim papers, then discovers that he is innocent; however, when he tells her Kenton is a crook, she indignantly declares herself engaged to him. Kenton and his henchmen stage a raid on the express office, and Bill arrests him--winning the confidence and finally the love of Jerry.

Less

GENRE


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Tokyo Joe

According to a 10 Dec 1948 HR news item, 2d unit director Art Black and cameramen Joseph Biroc and Emil Oster, Jr. shot 40,000 feet of background ... >>

The Killer Is Loose

Prior to the 13 Jun 1953 publication of the novelette The Killer Is Loose in The Saturday Evening Post , HR had reported, in ... >>

Zoot Suit

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Anjuli M. Singh, an independent ... >>

The Princess Bride

The synopsis and history for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Synopsis and history were written by Fitrah Hamid, a student at Georgia ... >>

Ferris Bueller's Day Off

The picture begins with actor Matthew Broderick, in the role of “Ferris Bueller,” speaking directly to the audience. His commentary continues intermittently throughout the picture.
       A 13 Jun ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.