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HISTORY

In 1927, Warner Bros. released Sailor Izzy Murphy starring George Jessel (see entry). While that film, which was directed by Henry Lehrman and co-starred Audrey Ferris, is not directly related to Private Izzy Murphy, reviews of Sailor Izzy Murphy noted that the title and comic situations capitalized on the earlier film's success. ...

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In 1927, Warner Bros. released Sailor Izzy Murphy starring George Jessel (see entry). While that film, which was directed by Henry Lehrman and co-starred Audrey Ferris, is not directly related to Private Izzy Murphy, reviews of Sailor Izzy Murphy noted that the title and comic situations capitalized on the earlier film's success.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Nov 1926
---
MPW
30 Oct 1926
---
New York Times
10 Nov 1926
p. 25
Variety
10 Nov 1926
p. 14
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 October 1926
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
20 October 1926
LP23177
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,889
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Isadore Goldberg, an enterprising Russian Jew, comes to the United States and establishes himself in the delicatessen business so that he can one day send for his parents. Forced to vacate his store, Izzy relocates in an Irish neighborhood; there, after he changes his surname to "Murphy," his business prospers. While waiting for a subway train, Izzy recovers a girl's handkerchief; later, he meets her in his store and learns that she is Eileen Cohannigan, from whose father he buys foodstuffs. After the arrival of Izzy's parents, he embarks for France with an all-Irish regiment and inspires his comrades to deeds of valor. He is welcomed home by Cohannigan, but when Cohannigan learns that he is Jewish, he denounces his daughter for loving him. With the aid of his service buddies, however, Izzy and Eileen head for City Hall to be ...

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Isadore Goldberg, an enterprising Russian Jew, comes to the United States and establishes himself in the delicatessen business so that he can one day send for his parents. Forced to vacate his store, Izzy relocates in an Irish neighborhood; there, after he changes his surname to "Murphy," his business prospers. While waiting for a subway train, Izzy recovers a girl's handkerchief; later, he meets her in his store and learns that she is Eileen Cohannigan, from whose father he buys foodstuffs. After the arrival of Izzy's parents, he embarks for France with an all-Irish regiment and inspires his comrades to deeds of valor. He is welcomed home by Cohannigan, but when Cohannigan learns that he is Jewish, he denounces his daughter for loving him. With the aid of his service buddies, however, Izzy and Eileen head for City Hall to be married.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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