The Lone Star Rush (1915)

Melodrama | March 1915

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HISTORY

A new film outfit, the Clyma Company, announced that it was completing its new block-size studios at 1025 Lillian Way in Hollywood, CA, and was beginning to shoot its first motion picture, according to the 7 November 1914 Motion Picture News. The company had incorporated four months earlier, in July, with $10,000 in capital. The president was Henry W. Keller, and the general manager was author and film producer Edmund Mitchell, whose own novel, The Lone Star Rush, was the studio's first project. Rene Guissart would be in charge of photography. The stock company members were listed as Bob Fraser, Charles Arling, Rupert Julian, Gordon Sackville, and leading lady Millie Bright, among others. Miss Bright apparently did not appear in the film. The company hoped to have The Lone Star Rush ready for release by 1 December 1914, but it was not issued until March 1915.
       By 12 December 1914, the company had changed its name to Climax, and its address was now 1225 Lillian Way according to a Motion Picture News item published that day. E. J. Sherman and Gene Guissart were in charge of the laboratories. It is uncertain whether Guissart was related to cameraman Rene Guissart or if the name "Gene" was a typographical error.
       The 12 December 1914 Motion Picture News reported that "General Manager Edmund Mitchell and players of the Climax company have completed filming the first production, Lone Star Rush, and the photographic plant is now making the first print which will have a private showing within the next few days." Many of the exterior scenes were filmed ...

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A new film outfit, the Clyma Company, announced that it was completing its new block-size studios at 1025 Lillian Way in Hollywood, CA, and was beginning to shoot its first motion picture, according to the 7 November 1914 Motion Picture News. The company had incorporated four months earlier, in July, with $10,000 in capital. The president was Henry W. Keller, and the general manager was author and film producer Edmund Mitchell, whose own novel, The Lone Star Rush, was the studio's first project. Rene Guissart would be in charge of photography. The stock company members were listed as Bob Fraser, Charles Arling, Rupert Julian, Gordon Sackville, and leading lady Millie Bright, among others. Miss Bright apparently did not appear in the film. The company hoped to have The Lone Star Rush ready for release by 1 December 1914, but it was not issued until March 1915.
       By 12 December 1914, the company had changed its name to Climax, and its address was now 1225 Lillian Way according to a Motion Picture News item published that day. E. J. Sherman and Gene Guissart were in charge of the laboratories. It is uncertain whether Guissart was related to cameraman Rene Guissart or if the name "Gene" was a typographical error.
       The 12 December 1914 Motion Picture News reported that "General Manager Edmund Mitchell and players of the Climax company have completed filming the first production, Lone Star Rush, and the photographic plant is now making the first print which will have a private showing within the next few days." Many of the exterior scenes were filmed in Southern California's Mojave Desert.
       Alliance Film Corp.'s release date for The Lone Star Rush was given only as "March" 1915 in several magazines, including the 27 March 1915 Moivng Picture World.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
12 Dec 1914
p. 38
Motion Picture News
7 Nov 1914
p. 67
Motion Picture News
20 Mar 1915
p. 39, 70
Motion Picture News
17 Apr 1915
p. 78
Motography
27 Mar 1915
p. 481, 498
Motography
3 Apr 1915
p. 548
Moving Picture World
20 Mar 1915
p. 1784
Moving Picture World
27 Mar 1915
p. 1977, 2002, 2010
Moving Picture World
17 Apr 1915
p. 398
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Lone Star Rush by Edmund Mitchell (London, 1902).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
March 1915
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Climax Co., Inc.
20 January 1915
LU4259
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Harry Murray saves an old gold prospector named Rhodda from dying of thirst in the Australian desert, and in gratitude, Rhodda promises the young man a share of his claim. The treasure map, however, is stolen by the villainous Potosi Jim, who sends his partner Blaxland to gather money to develop the claim while he searches for the gold. The theft prompts Rhodda to die of shock, after which Harry, accompanied by his sheep-herder brother Jack, sets out in pursuit of Potosi Jim. Blaxland returns to the goldfields with the wealthy Colonel Baylor, a capitalist named Cuthbert, and Cuthbert's pretty daughter, Hilda. They all meet during the search, but Potosi Jim stampedes the horses belonging to Harry and Jack, and is therefore able to beat them to the claim. As the two brothers continue their own search for gold, they find a map near a centuries-old skeleton in the desert, which leads them to a deposit of placer gold so immense that it starts a new gold rush in the area. Potosi Jim and Blaxland find that their mine is worthless, while Harry wins fame, fortune and the undying love of ...

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Harry Murray saves an old gold prospector named Rhodda from dying of thirst in the Australian desert, and in gratitude, Rhodda promises the young man a share of his claim. The treasure map, however, is stolen by the villainous Potosi Jim, who sends his partner Blaxland to gather money to develop the claim while he searches for the gold. The theft prompts Rhodda to die of shock, after which Harry, accompanied by his sheep-herder brother Jack, sets out in pursuit of Potosi Jim. Blaxland returns to the goldfields with the wealthy Colonel Baylor, a capitalist named Cuthbert, and Cuthbert's pretty daughter, Hilda. They all meet during the search, but Potosi Jim stampedes the horses belonging to Harry and Jack, and is therefore able to beat them to the claim. As the two brothers continue their own search for gold, they find a map near a centuries-old skeleton in the desert, which leads them to a deposit of placer gold so immense that it starts a new gold rush in the area. Potosi Jim and Blaxland find that their mine is worthless, while Harry wins fame, fortune and the undying love of Hilda.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.