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HISTORY

The 17 Jul 1915 Motion Picture News announced the acquisition of Paul Armstrong’s 1905 play, The Heir to the Hoorah, by Samuel Goldfish (later known as Goldwyn) of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. Location shooting took place in the “Asierra, Nevada, Mountains,” which may have referred to the Sierra Nevada Mountains in northeastern California. Interiors were filmed at Lasky Studios in Los Angeles, CA, as noted in the 11 Nov 1916 Motography.
       An item in the Dec 1916 Motion Picture claimed that lead actor Thomas Meighan intended to adopt the unidentified infant who appeared in the film, but its mother declined, arguing that Meighan’s room at the Los Angeles Athletic Club was not a suitable environment for child-rearing.
       The Heir to the Hoorah was released 26 Oct 1916, and opened at New York City’s Broadway Theatre in early Nov 1916. A Chicago, IL, opening followed on 17 Nov 1916. Reviews were generally positive.
       On 15 Nov 1916, the New York Clipper reported on a longstanding court case, which determined that Paul Armstrong’s play had been plagiarized from the short story, "The Transmogrification of Dan” by Henry J. W. Dam.
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The 17 Jul 1915 Motion Picture News announced the acquisition of Paul Armstrong’s 1905 play, The Heir to the Hoorah, by Samuel Goldfish (later known as Goldwyn) of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. Location shooting took place in the “Asierra, Nevada, Mountains,” which may have referred to the Sierra Nevada Mountains in northeastern California. Interiors were filmed at Lasky Studios in Los Angeles, CA, as noted in the 11 Nov 1916 Motography.
       An item in the Dec 1916 Motion Picture claimed that lead actor Thomas Meighan intended to adopt the unidentified infant who appeared in the film, but its mother declined, arguing that Meighan’s room at the Los Angeles Athletic Club was not a suitable environment for child-rearing.
       The Heir to the Hoorah was released 26 Oct 1916, and opened at New York City’s Broadway Theatre in early Nov 1916. A Chicago, IL, opening followed on 17 Nov 1916. Reviews were generally positive.
       On 15 Nov 1916, the New York Clipper reported on a longstanding court case, which determined that Paul Armstrong’s play had been plagiarized from the short story, "The Transmogrification of Dan” by Henry J. W. Dam.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture
Dec 1916
p. 124
Motion Picture News
17 Jul 1915
p. 111
Motion Picture News
23 Sep 1916
p. 1846
Motion Picture News
11 Nov 1916
p. 3017
Motography
4 Nov 1916
p. 1046
Motography
11 Nov 1916
p. 1095, 1099
Motography
18 Nov 1916
p. 1150
Moving Picture World
11 Nov 1916
p. 832, 842, 914
New York Clipper
8 Nov 1916
p. 34
New York Clipper
15 Nov 1916
p. 22
NYDM
18 Nov 1916
p. 1067
Variety
3 Nov 1916
p. 30
Wid's Daily
2 Nov 1916
p. 1075
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
William C. de Mille
Dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Heir to the Hoorah by Paul Armstrong (New York, 10 Apr 1905).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 October 1916
Premiere Information:
New York opening: early Nov 1916; Chicago opening: 17 Nov 1916
Production Date:
began Sep 1916
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co.
13 October 1916
LP9301
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The Hoorah mine in California has turned Joe Lacy, Bud and Bill into millionares, but they all lament that, as single men, they have no children to whom they can leave their money. As a result, Bud and Bill convince Joe to get married. He makes only half-hearted attempts, however, until he falls in love with Geraldine Kent, whose social climbing mother hates Joe's bad breeding but adores his bank account. Soon after the wedding, Joe learns that Geraldine, at her mother's urging, married him only for his money, and so he leaves her. Then, a year later, he decides to track her down when he discovers that she has had a child. Because she has come to love him during their separation, Geraldine reconciles with Joe as soon as he finds her and then presents him with the heir he had wanted so ...

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The Hoorah mine in California has turned Joe Lacy, Bud and Bill into millionares, but they all lament that, as single men, they have no children to whom they can leave their money. As a result, Bud and Bill convince Joe to get married. He makes only half-hearted attempts, however, until he falls in love with Geraldine Kent, whose social climbing mother hates Joe's bad breeding but adores his bank account. Soon after the wedding, Joe learns that Geraldine, at her mother's urging, married him only for his money, and so he leaves her. Then, a year later, he decides to track her down when he discovers that she has had a child. Because she has come to love him during their separation, Geraldine reconciles with Joe as soon as he finds her and then presents him with the heir he had wanted so badly.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.