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HISTORY

An advertisement in the 16 Nov 1929 [Baltimore, MD] Afro-American gave the following short description: “Two brothers in love with the same girl, see these brothers love, thrilling, love drama. Oh boy!”
       Larry Richards’s 1998 book, African American Films Through 1959, listed Bessie Gibbens, Gertrude Snelson, Ethel Smith, and Alice B. Russell (Micheaux’s wife) as cast members. The film was at least partly shot in Chicago, IL, where the Lion’s Den nightclub served as a location, according to an item in the 28 Nov 1929 Philadelphia Tribune, which noted that the nightclub scene caused Chicago censors to halt the film’s release. Nearly a year later, a 13 Nov 1930 Philadelphia Tribune advertisement indicated that the film was still in release, with an upcoming 17-18 Nov 1930 engagement scheduled at Philadelphia’s Dixie Theatre.
       For more information on filmmaker Oscar Micheaux, see The Homesteader. As of Oct 2019, the National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films. ...

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An advertisement in the 16 Nov 1929 [Baltimore, MD] Afro-American gave the following short description: “Two brothers in love with the same girl, see these brothers love, thrilling, love drama. Oh boy!”
       Larry Richards’s 1998 book, African American Films Through 1959, listed Bessie Gibbens, Gertrude Snelson, Ethel Smith, and Alice B. Russell (Micheaux’s wife) as cast members. The film was at least partly shot in Chicago, IL, where the Lion’s Den nightclub served as a location, according to an item in the 28 Nov 1929 Philadelphia Tribune, which noted that the nightclub scene caused Chicago censors to halt the film’s release. Nearly a year later, a 13 Nov 1930 Philadelphia Tribune advertisement indicated that the film was still in release, with an upcoming 17-18 Nov 1930 engagement scheduled at Philadelphia’s Dixie Theatre.
       For more information on filmmaker Oscar Micheaux, see The Homesteader. As of Oct 2019, the National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included this film on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Afro-American [Baltimore, MD]
28 Dec 1929
p. 7
Afro-American [Baltimore, MD]
31 Aug 1929
p. 9
Afro-American [Baltimore, MD]
2 Nov 1929
p. 18
Afro-American [Baltimore, MD]
16 Nov 1929
Section A, p. 8
Baltimore Sun
12 Oct 1930
p. 44
Indianapolis Recorder [Indianapolis, IN]
16 Aug 1930
p. 3
New York Age
28 Sep 1929
p. 6
New York Age
26 Oct 1929
p. 6
New York Amsterdam News
25 Sep 1929
p. 9
New York Amsterdam News
2 Oct 1929
p. 8
New York Amsterdam News
23 Oct 1929
p. 8
Philadelphia Tribune
29 Aug 1929
p. 6
Philadelphia Tribune
24 Oct 1929
p. 6
Philadelphia Tribune
28 Nov 1929
p. 6
Philadelphia Tribune
13 Nov 1930
p. 7
Pittsburgh Courier
21 Dec 1929
p. 19
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
A. Burton Russell
Pres
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1929
Premiere Information:
Philadelphia opening: 1 Sep 1929; New York opening: 28 Sep 1929; Pittsburgh opening: 23 Dec 1929
Production Date:

Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The following plot synopsis appeared in the 28 Sep 1929 New York Age: "Briefly, it is the story of a beautiful girl, who was cold to the love of a good and ambitious young lad. Believing the rosy promises of a smooth-tongued stranger, she runs away and follows him to the city. The unhappiness and disaster which followed can easily be imagined. Deserted on her wedding night--alone, penniless, in a foreign city, left to the none too tender mercy of strangers. Her sad plight and the events which follow her desertion make a gripping, brutally frank, yet wonderfully, absorbing ...

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The following plot synopsis appeared in the 28 Sep 1929 New York Age: "Briefly, it is the story of a beautiful girl, who was cold to the love of a good and ambitious young lad. Believing the rosy promises of a smooth-tongued stranger, she runs away and follows him to the city. The unhappiness and disaster which followed can easily be imagined. Deserted on her wedding night--alone, penniless, in a foreign city, left to the none too tender mercy of strangers. Her sad plight and the events which follow her desertion make a gripping, brutally frank, yet wonderfully, absorbing picture."

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
African American


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.